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a particularly hard-headed vendor. I have no interest in them and the coated stock on which many are printed isn't even good for starting a fire! Did receive what should be my only seed order for the spring season last week. Still looking for a suitable "French" filet bean to replace the Delinel variety that I grew for so many years, so this year's package includes two "new-to-me" varieties. Down here, bulbing onions generally are transplanted in December. Those grown for their tops only may be planted in all but the hottest months because, even under the best conditions, they'll never make bulbs down here—not even "global warming" is going to change day length. This past fall, I direct seeded the cooking onions in one bed and they are doing as well as the transplants so that's what I'll do next fall. The onions seem to be getting along with the garlic, carrots, lettuce, cauliflower, broccoli raab and bok choy with which they're sharing beds and (most of) which will be long gone by the time the onions are ready.

What does that mean?
What would it otherwise do and—assuming a relationship to temperature—at what temperature range would you expect the garlic to do it?
I'm inferring the absence of snow cover; if cold weather usually kills the tops h ow cold does it have to get and for how long?
My garlic (a warm climate "Creole" variety) spent two months in the 'fridge at ±33° before planting and is growing apace: The first planting is now approximately 28" tall (measured it this morning) and the second, set out two weeks later, is not far behind. Down here, temps in the low 30's are occasional (and of short duration—hours); those in the 20's, unusual. I cover the garlic when expected overnight lows would harm the mustard and the turnip greens (near freezing). Can I assume the garlic in full flush to be hardy to those temps? If so, I'll stop wasting my time, then. I don't have enough planted this year to "test" but next year I'll set some in a container that will remain exposed.

cell walls (not necessarily a "bad" thing) and does not destroy the chlorophyll. Proper low-temperature drying reduces moisture, concentrates flavor, mellows volatile aromatics (chew a fresh bay leaf to see what I mean), leaves cell walls intact (not necessarily a "good" thing) and destroys chlorophyll, which is harsh and bitter.

notebook to track that info, with the addition of harvest dates and yields plus the date each vegetable is removed from the garden. Seed sources are not an issue because I buy from only two sources.     I use a fairly sophisticated computer graphics program to record and reference my garden. The base layer (virtual overlay) holds a to-scale outline drawing of the entire garden. Each major planting ("season") gets a layer of its own on which I can enter (text), planting date, number planted, emergence, first harvest, removal in the respective beds or containers. I also record whether I had to fill-in or replant. My gardening "year" starts with February "spring" planting. Each year is an individual file that contains the complete history to date. Sounds complex but isn't and really makes it easy to keep up with rotation. At least I am not (yet) obsessive enough to import actual photos of plants but I can see where doing so would save some typing.

ball of wax—or, at least, the fixes—to a CD, maybe?
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Derald
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As far as I remember, the cold here has never killed the garlic. It's just that 20°F is miserably cold. The garlic was planted in last October and is about 6" tall. I buy garlic from Costco and use the largest cloves for planting. After this year I will start again to save the largest cloves for planting. I had been doing that for several years but last year was such a flop that I started over.

Win 7 is not as easy to deal with as Win XP was. Once I remembered that backed up files were read only, I changed them and things started working correctly.
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USA
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protection. I did not plant garlic until the end of November, after the weather began to cool a bit. It already is over 2' tall, on average. One bed is interplanted with mustard and turnips and another with a variety of cool weather veggies.

failure caused me to shop around for another vendor as well as for a variety better suited to the warm humid Gulf coast climate. Settled on a grower in Arizona (warm but definitely not humid) and hope to produce starts of my own that might be better suited to this environment. Down here, the sudden onset of unrelenting hot weather in April or May causes garlic heads to divide before they're fully mature but the Creoles came to North Amereica via the Caribbean and Mexico and are, reputedly, better suited to peninsular Florida's warm winters and short cool season. We'll see....

containers small enough to move into shelter. I expend more effort protecting sweet marjoram, thyme, oregano and tarragon from the harsh sun and from too much rain than from cold. I'm some distance south of the "official" ranges for those but they do well in open shade with only morning sun so I move them around as the seasons progress.

I "need" no longer function. I'm still running Win2k on one box and WinXP on another. Will keep an obsolete O/S at least one because the graphics app I mentioned is a ca 1990's port from Mac to 16-bit Window$ and, AFAIK, new "improved" Windows won't run 16-bit programs.

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Derald
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I can no longer run my Spider game. It is a 16 bit program too. There seems to be some way to set things up if you are running Win 7 Pro.
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Derald wrote:

when we get through to where the snow melts back i'll be able to see how well that garlic you sent me held up to the cold.
i'm suspecting that garlic regularly grown in the Carribean may be a bit tender in comparison to the garlic i've grown here for many years.
the hard-neck type has stayed green and kept looking nice at least down to 17F when not snow covered. under snow it seems to be fine no matter what happens upstairs. for damage i think it takes several days of dry freeze 15F or lower. but then it comes back in the spring anyways and does fine. that happened last season as we did not have much snow cover during a severe cold spell. i still had nice heads of garlic. this winter is being much colder in comparison, but plenty of snow cover.
sadly enough, the lady who gave me the garlic passed away last Sunday at a ripe age of 88. peacefully and at home so that was good to hear, but still will miss her as she was quite the character.
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