Thank you! (Other than mint . . .)

Thank you for all the wonderful suggestions, some I had thought of but others were new ideas. This group is so great!
In my searching, I found this web page which has likely been posted here before but I'll post it again. This particular page at the site is specifically about sun herbs. http://www.paghat.com/garden16.html
Millennium Farms opened their greenhouse yesterday so I made my first trip there the first day. I limited myself to one berry flat of plants because I tend to go a bit overboard on the first trip. The limit was because the garden isn't rototilled yet.
I bought: Pink Top Agastache (for the butterflies and hummingbirds as well as bees) Dukat Dill (should be pretty as well as good for the bees, and later birds) French Tarragon (which I'll put in my herb garden and starts slips to transplant) English Thyme (which I'll put in my herb garden and starts slips to transplant) Sweet Woodruff (got two of those on recommendation though tag says part-shade so will put only one out there) Tricolor Sage Golden Sage Lavendar Blue Star Chinese Lantern Pennyroyal (bought three but will put only one out there and see how it does in full sun) And one Sun Gold tomato plant just because I had to buy at least one tomato!
---------------- snipped-for-privacy@centurytel.net writes:

I wish it was in a location that wouldn't be accessible to passing male dogs! There are many things I would love to plant there. In 2002, I put a lot of my "mystery" tomato plants out there and had neighborhood children adopt them. I put signs with the child's name on the ones that belonged to someone with the others having a sign that said they were for everyone to pick. They were very popular. The children were, of course, cautioned to take the tomatoes home to wash them before they ate them, and, surprisingly, they did! Cool. The following year, the chickens had cleaned out the seeds in the garden so there were very few volunteers to plant elsewhere so I didn't do it last year.

Unfortunately, Millennium's creeping thyme wasn't yet ready. I have a Spicy Oregano plant that I think I'll move out there as I rarely use it, always cutting from the others first. Katra, what is Dittany of Crete? -------------- snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com writes:

LOL. I'm trying to discourage cats coming around though I'd love to plant some other than in the pot in the tree.

Thank you, Julie. I have some Lemon Balm from last year that has done very well (bordered by a bottomless pot) that could use some dividing. I'll put several starts from it out there. It's so especially pleasant smelling which is exactly what I want. -------------- snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

Thank you, Dianna. The Lemon Balm from last year has done well in nearly full sun so I'll try that. I'll definitely consider the artemesias, such a good idea. A dill plant is going out there; will it cross with the Anise or is that completely unrelated? (I've been told to keep dill and fennel apart.) -------------- snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net writes:

Thank you, Henriette. There are a lot of really good suggestions there, many of which I will incorporate. I have California poppies left over from when I had wildflowers on part of it the first year I was here, including some really lovely cream colored ones. They really are pretty even though an annoyance where they're not wanted. ---------------- snipped-for-privacy@removethistoreply.yahoo.com writes:

strip. I have several different ones in my herb garden now and will definitely try to make starts from what I have.
Wooly Thyme wasn't ready yet either. :-( ---------------- snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com writes:

With all the suggestions about these, I'm seriously thinking of expanding those to the parking strip next year if this works out. It would sure reduce the mowing!

I'd love to grow asparagus there, it would certainly be a good location with extra fertilizer. However, both of the spears that have come through this year at the corner of my house have been stolen already! That stinks. One of my favorite childhood memories is collecting asparagus in the spring from the ditchbanks on my grandparents' farm. The biggest problem with asparagus in this location would be that it probably shouldn't be eaten (because of the dogs), and people would pick it and eat it. Ick. I already do have berries on the inside that I let grow through for the children to pick, though the bushes on the outside would be good but then I'd need to water which is what I want to avoid. ------------------- snipped-for-privacy@fastmail.fm writes:

The chives are a wonderful idea! I love to see them bloom. Since I have plenty in the herb garden, these can bloom away and spread to their hearts' content. :-)

I was concerned Rosemary would get too high, but someone else suggested prostrate Rosemary so I'll try that. In the meantime, I might make some starts and plant the taller varieties and move it to another area as it gets larger in another couple of years. I've long considered a Rosemary and Lavender hedge along the fish pond; this would be a good way to start it until the arborvitae is completely out of that location. --------------
I'd love to be able to sow Thyme seeds out there but I tried it last year beside my storage shed and not a single plant from three packages of seeds! (All came from Shumway so I'm not sure if it was me, the location or possibly bad seeds.) It doesn't seem like I have even a slightly green thumb. It only goes to verify what I say about my garden . . . it grows in spite of me, not because of me.
Thank you, again, everyone, for all the wonderful ideas!
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote in message

Given that asparagus is out, and raspberry is probably taking too much space, you could still consider sorrel and horseradish. Both are very aggressive weeds, even though they don't blanket the ground. Right now (Zone 5.5) I am enjoying the abundant, early production of sorrel leaves (making lots of sorrel soup), which at the end of the winter is just perfect for a tired body. And it takes absolutely no work except cutting the leaves. Sorrel also goes well in many summer soups, like tomato-corn or ratatouille. Horseradish, of course, you have to like it to plant it, but young leaves less than three inches are a good salad green (mild tasting, just a hint of hot). They will be up in 15 days here.
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In article

very strong and widely spread roots. DAMHIKT :-).

Just a thought. After suggesting the thyme, I remembered thrift, which has been described as "chives without the smell". Since you already have enough chives, that's a similar alternative. And it comes in dwarf as well as ordinary.
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snipped-for-privacy@fastmail.fm says...

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On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 12:36:05 -0700, Glenna Rose wrote:

In times past, paghat was a prolific poster to this newsgroup. You could probably Google the archives and find dozens of her posts ... including a couple arguments with me. :-) Bill
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