temp and tomato fruit set

Is it true what I read about the fruit not setting in night time temps are too high? I have read mixed reports and am not sure what to think (like there is anything I can do about it short of putting a fan in the garden at night-which btw: I don't see myself doing)
Norma
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On Sat, 15 May 2004 17:36:01 GMT in

http://www.gardeners.com/sell.asp?ProdGroupID 750
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On Sat, 15 May 2004 17:36:01 GMT, "Norma J. Briggs" <nbriggs@(NO SPAM)houston.rr.com> wrote:>Is it true what I read about the fruit not setting in night time temps are

Where did you read that? Tomatoes will fail to bloom and/or set fruit when *daytime* temperatures get above 90F, or some such, and tomato plants don't care for nighttime temperatures in the 40s, but I've never heard about some nighttime upper-limit temperature. Tomatoes just slow down when it's really, really hot. Around here, that means hot night AND day. Less humid climates cool a lot more at night. And "slow down" doesn't mean they stop or die -- they just become somewhat less productive for a while.
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No one told the random tomatoes we planted here the past couple years. The hotter it got the better they liked it. And we often get a couple weeks with daytime temps regularly hitting 115F. This year's random tomatos (freebies from the fair, one is Champion and I forget the other variety, maybe Challenger??) decided to bloom for the first time during a cold snap, when temps were in the 40-50 range all the time.
Maybe it's the desert climate... too much sun on their heads makes plants crazy ;)
~REZ~
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On Sun, 16 May 2004 15:27:36 GMT in
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) graced the world with this thought:

I've always been under the impression that beefsteaks like warm weather...
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On Sun, 16 May 2004 15:27:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Rez) wrote:

Sorry. I wrote as if this (tomatoes not setting fruit in hot weather) is universal and absolute. It *is* what many references on growing tomatoes suggest, and has also been my and friends' experience.
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I've noticed that a lot of veggies behave weirdly in this area. You should see how strange broccoli grows here -- the heading kind doesn't make heads, it makes leafy things with occasional spates of bloom (which are tasty but not much to them). Probably due to having a rather broad climate range (middling winter to severe summer, sometimes on the same day), low moisture, and soil with very skewed and sometimes absent nutrients (beyond where you can amend it to normalcy).
Or maybe it's the relatively high background radiation ... the reason they put Edwards AFB in the Antelope Valley in the first place, was because the soil was considered too radioactive for human habitation (lots of uranium deposits), and they figured a research base wasn't going to make it any worse. We do see lots of mutated/deformed stink beetles... Now it's going on half a million residents and is the fastest growing city in the U.S. Just wait til our mutant descendants take over the world. <g>
~REZ~
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snipped-for-privacy@roastbeef.net writes:

Would seem so. That was my grandparents' market tomato, sold hundreds of flats of them every year. They lived in the Yakima Valley . . . that's warm weather!
Glenna
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writes:

I guess that again --the correct answer is: it depends. I have read differing ideas about tempatue and fruit setting, most of the literature claims night temps to be the most crucial. I will see. At this point there is no turning back but next year I may try to grow varieties that are recommened by the Texas Ag office breed for the heat. Amazing how as amateur gardeners we go from just trying to keep the plant alive to wanting maximum production!
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