taking chances with early plantings

it being so warm and due to be for a week at least (in the 80sF tomorrow forecast) perhaps i can get some sprouts up of plants that i have many seeds for. i need to cover some bare dirt.
first i planted one third of the onion seeds i harvested last year. i'm going to plant another third in a few weeks and then the last a few weeks later.
then turnips which say to plant in early spring. we'll see how they do. first time i'm trying these. will plant the rest in a few weeks.
last i put in peas to cover the side of a small raised bed. don't expect them to do much at all, but if they go they'll be welcome if they can survive any remaining frosts. last year the peas in the late summer/fall went quite far past the initial cold spells so i'm hoping that these will come up and have enough strength before some cold returns.
songbird
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I am really trying to resist the temptation to plant. Our actual frost date is April 15 but I am usually planted by the 1st. Onion question, I put out a bunch of sets. They have grown well for the amount of time they have been out there but the few I have pulled are mush. It has been very dry so I don't know what would have made them rot. MJ
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

sorry, i cannot claim onion expertise as this is the first season i am trying to grow them from seed.
usually we put rooted plants out (not sets) that are in a flat at a time, like plugs, around the last week of May and have nice big fat onions by mid-summer that we pull up and eat as needed. we know they are done when the tops start falling over.
i've wanted to try onion sets (the small bulbs that are dry with no roots or green on them) for several years now, but haven't yet. we'd like to grow more than one variety this year.
is the whole plant mush or just the bulb part?
my guess (hey, this is usenet :) ), is that you have green on top and roots below. the bulb has served it's purpose and will degenerate until the leaves and roots can form the new bulb. so unless you are really wanting a green onion for eating this isn't the time to pull them yet.
if they've fallen over early, then something else is going on. if the complete plant is mush then i dunno what has happened. we haven't had that trouble here yet. the trouble we have is with the raccoons digging up the plugs of soil the plants were grown in because the greenhouse must have used a fertiliser that smells like food to a raccoon...
planting the seeds and sets, we hope, will eliminate the problem, but we'll still likely put in the plug type onion plants again as they have been good for us.
oh, and i'm planting bunching onions for green onion eating too as we do like them but i've not put them out before. package says to plant them after danger of frost so that will be a bit yet.
songbird
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songbird wrote:

I've tried the white onions Walmart sells in the bag , small bulbs that can either be planted 3" or so deep for greens or shallow for regular onions . Plant 'em deep , they haven't been all that great for bulb onions . I'm going to try some of the other types they have this year , along with another bag of the little whites . I'm also going to try garlic if I can find some sets .
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Snag
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I bet I didn't plant mine deep enough and that is why they have gone soft and mushy. damn
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Good luck.
--

Billy

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Billy wrote: ...

thanks! :)
songbird
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Billy wrote: ...

the weather has been 40 degrees F or more above normal (low 40s). the turnips and peas have sprouted. onions i expect soon. forecast looks fine. another week and i won't worry as much if the sprouts can withstand a light frost or a bit of snow.
a little rain last night, good deal, i was going to have to water again and i'd just gotten a few yards of shredded bark and leaves spread out and some dug in. that garden is starting to look nice and is ready for planting.
hm, think i will take it easy today and do some light weeding and frog around randomly.
songbird
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songbird wrote:

Are you saying that when you bend over to weed you get offers to play leapfrog?
D
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

haha, right.
i usually sit when weeding. if there are any frogs involved in that they would likely regret it.
songbird
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songbird wrote:

forecast change, now frost likely.
onion sprouts showed up yesterday.
songbird
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songbird wrote:
...
how it went or is going...
the peas and onions are doing fine. peas started flowering a few days ago. onions are on th third round of planting by seeds. supposedly these will be edible size by fall. if so i will be very impressed. i'm also guessing that i will have to thin them somewhat for that to happen. otherwise i'll have sets for next year (which is what i was expecting). hmmm.
seeing the peas flowering (these have white flowers) reminds me how much i've missed fresh peas and pods from last season. seems ages ago now even after a mild winter.
the turnips which suffered the most frost damage and i was wondering if i'd lost all of them. there were enough seeds planted that i have a nice patch of them and didn't have to thin. i'm contemplating a few leaves to give them a taste for fresh/cooked greens soon. the second turnip planting in another space was last week. sprouted fine, will have to thin these if the bunnies don't find them.
only one frost the past week so i'm thinking we are getting close to being ready for me getting the rest of my seeds in the ground other than the okra. i'll wait a while longer on that since we still have somewhat cool nights here or there.
overall though, it's been a good spring season with some rain here or there that i'm not having to water all the time. but the past week has been dry. cloudy today but no rain.
in other news, the swiss chard is coming along ok, onion sets are doing well (worm poo for those we'll see how they compare to previous seasons when we've done this differently), rhubarb is still ready to be picked, strawberries blooming and putting some fruit on, garlic doing well...
for critters it's been an ok year so far, we've heard a pheasant calling for the first time in several years out back. had to take a grackle nest out of the top of the lighthouse. always fun. decided to fill it up with sprayfoam crack filler to keep them from doing it again. once by accident, two no longer a charm, won't let them get a third try. it's too high up to be fun to check. spray painted the foam so it doesn't stand out so much visually when looking up. by keeping after them with the air rifle to discourage them and keeping the nests out of the cedar trees we've cut the grackle invasion force by quite a bit, yet when they come through in the spring and fall they are in the thousands so this is purely a local turf control effort that is pointless longer term, but it does keep them from regurgitating poop from their nests in the birdbaths.
the rest of the smaller birds around and the many other species of birds do much better when the grackles aren't so numerous either. three years ago it was a flock of twenty something grackles, now it is four or five. that means a steady effort at discouraging them because they don't go away or stop building nests just because you take one nest down... usually it takes until mid-june and then it slacks off, but even then they can still put a nest in a surprising place. two weeks ago we had a nest in the wheel of a propped up wheelbarrow, much easier to deal with than the top of the lighthouse...
had a muskrat half way up the pathway to the house yesterday. gave it a gentle nudge with the air rifle. bunnies have already had their warning shots... i hope the hawks or feral kitties will get them before i do. same with chipmunks, but will also put some rat traps with peanut butter out for them soon. it's no fun and i would like it much better if the snakes could eat them all, but that isn't how nature works sometimes... we do have a good snake population all around. something about all these rocks... :) keeping the chipmunk numbers down is the only way to keep the strawberries from getting raided. i've increased the strawberry plantings all over to compensate, but i'm hoping those actually end up as jam and not chippie food. we'll see how that goes.
ok, so how is your gardening season going? any new adventures paying off well or frustrations you are figuring out?
songbird
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