Siberian tomato

Has anyone tried these? The claim is that they do not need minimum temperatures to set fruit. If this is true, it would go a long way to justifying the seed price. Also, if you have been successful with these, have you been able to save seed that stayed true to type?
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Jun 2006 14:48:34 +1200, snipped-for-privacy@nelson.planet.org.nz (Mike) wrote:

I tried them as my early tomatoes one year, and only got so so results. The problem was not the temperatures, though, it was when I was at the height of the <spit!>thrip problem in my yard, and they rapidly succumbed to Tomato Spotted Wilt virus. I guess I should give them another chance.
For early tomatoes, the most consistent producer that I've had is the Polish heirloom Stupice. It's disease resistant, produces golf ball to tennis ball-size tomatoes a good month earlier than anything else, and keeps producing in the summer heat. Last year I cut about 10 green tomatoes off the vine in late October when we had our first frost warning.
They do have green shoulders, which fussy people have a problem with, but they're very flavorful.
Penelope
--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn" < snipped-for-privacy@everybodycansing.com>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Penelope Periwinkle Wrote:

Siberian, Russian and Ukranian tomatoes are chosen because they have short season and will set at lower temperatures. I grow Black Princ which is the most commonly grown commercial variety in Russia. It doe well outside and seed runs true
-- DJBrenton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I tried them once, two years ago in hope of getting early season tomatoes. While I did get some smallish fruit, my plants didn't make it through the summer. By the time I pulled them they were not too pretty. I didn't bother trying to save the seed. I would not plant these again, even for late season tomatoes, as I have found that Better Boy produces for me right up until frost and is quite disease resistant.
J.
Mike wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.