Shady veggies wanted

I have a spot where I would like to plant some veggies but the area gets only 3-4 hours of sun in the summer and I was wondering if anything worth while would grow there. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. BTW I have roses growing there right now which I want to move to the front of the house which would open up the area hopefully for berries or vegetables.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a spot where I would like to plant some veggies but the area gets only 3-4 hours of sun in the summer and I was wondering if anything worth while would grow there. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. BTW I have roses growing there right now which I want to move to the front of the house which would open up the area hopefully for berries or vegetables.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3-4 hours of sun in the summer and I was wondering if anything worth while would grow there. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Nothing much vegetable-wise weill do well with that little light. They really need full sun, or at least six to eight hours of full sun, including the noon hour.
--
Ann
e-mail address is not checked
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snowman snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com said:

In my experience, the most likely veggies to produce where shade is an issue are green beans, chives, parsley, lettuce and a few other types of loose, leafy greens.
It's far better if most of the sun is in the morning and most of the shade is in the afternoon than the other way around.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pat Kiewicz" wrote said:

i wonder if ground cover spinach would work there or how about what here in New Zealand is called silverbeet. its not a beet per se. its a dark green leafy plant. full of iron and tastes good steamed on its own or chopped and tossed into pasta sauce or casseroles. not sure what its called wherever you live. :) hang on, i'll google it for ya and find out other names.... Swiss Chard, i should of remembered this. my mom loved it. she lived in california. i just never made the connection between the names. silly me. heres some info i found.
Nutritional Information: 1/2 cup cooked silverbeet is a serve, and is:  a good source of folate.*  a source of fibre, vitamin C, vitamin A and iron.  Low joule with only 62kJ per 100g.
Like English spinach, silverbeet is a source of iron. Its rich stores of this valuable mineral however are not well absorbed by our digestive system. Silverbeet is also relatively high in sodium (429mg per100gm) and should therefore be considered carefully by those on low salt diets. *Cooked silverbeet supplies about 60 micrograms of folate per serve. An increased maternal folate consumption in at least the month before and 3 months following conception may reduce the risk of foetal neural tube defects. It is wise for women planning a pregnancy to consume a minimum of 400ug folate per day in at least the month prior to conception and at least 3 months following conception. Availability: All year
Selection: Fresh silverbeet has dark green, crisp leaves and a crisp creamy white fleshy stem. Avoid silverbeet with wilted stems or leaves and scarring.
Storage: Remove the string binding the bunch together after purchase, as this can bruise the stalks. Remove damaged leaves and cut back the white stalk and store in the refrigerator in an airtight plastic bag. Silverbeet should be consumed within a few days of purchase.
Preparation Information:  Salad (raw)  Stir fry  Steam  Microwave  Soup
Wash the leaves and stalks in cold salted water and drain well. Slice and use in stir-fries, quiches or filo parcels with fetta cheese. Silverbeet can also be steamed or pureed and used in soups, as a side vegetable or shredded and added raw to salads. Cook as briefly as possible to retain maximum nutrient content.
Historical Information: This is the vegetable, with its big, dark green leaves and white veins and stalk that many Australians mistakenly call spinach. Silverbeet is in fact a close relative of both spinach and beetroot. Used for many centuries, silverbeet was mentioned in Roman writings dating back to the 3rd and 4th centuries BC. Even before this time it was a popular vegetable, thought to have originated in the Mediterranean.
----------------------------------------
maybe the ground cover spinach is better after reading that info. didnt know silverbeet was high in sodium, nor that the iron is not easily digestable. oddly its a staple vege here. often pureed for babys around 1yr old and up.
lots of links on google for NZ spinach. as i dont know u'r location, cant say which one would be the best source of the seeds. its grown in our climate yr round. tho one website says only grown in summer. go figure.
i guess i can leave that to you to find. guess thats all i can suggest for your vege plot.
cheers,
jeanne
<argh, why is this double spacing?>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Both worth a try.
Rhubarb also, at least in zone 7 or cooler (roughly) (I don't think the original poster gave a location).
There are bean varities which are specifically bred for partial shade (the traditional example is growing up maize stalks in a maize field). I know I've seen them at http://www.southernexposure.com/ ; don't know about other seed catalogs.
But the person who said "forget about veggies in the shade" is partly right. There aren't a lot of vegetables that can take shade. You might consider looking for a shade-tolerant rose instead (Rosa rugosa is the best known, although it is considered invasive some places. Here in the Washington, DC area we have a native rose called Rosa palustris). Depends on what you are looking for in a rose, though - you can get rosehips and fragrance out of many of these roses but most of them don't have the large flowers with many petals we've come to expect from hybrid teas and other cultivated roses.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.