seeds

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wrote:

It's a hot weather spinach substitute, comes in green and red. Another hot weather spinach substitute.. malabar spinach .. dunno what the longevity of that seed is ;-) links below. Janice
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MV103 http://www.gardenguides.com/seedcatalog/herbs/orachburgandy.htm http://www.pizazz.com/plants/quiche.htm
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in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com, Janice at snipped-for-privacy@removethstoreply.yahoo.com wrote on 13/4/04 6:52 pm:

Thanks you, Ellen
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il Tue, 13 Apr 2004 19:52:46 -0600, Janice ha scritto:

[snip]
Hot weather? The notes say it bolts in hot weather. For a true hot weather spinach try New Zealand Spinach. It doesn't have the oxalic acid flavour of silverbeet and is mild, easy to eat raw.
http://www.innvista.com/health/foods/vegetables/nzspin.htm http://www.yankeeharvest.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=HSV2077
For summer greens I use rocket a lot (when there are no cats around to spray it!!).
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ah ok, never grown it... warmer weather than spinach I guess. I had some seed once, and before I could plant them, .. they croaked That reminds me, I'm supposed to be filling out an order for more lettuce seed so maybe I can get some planted and growing before it turns hot .. like last year. Got up to 100F last May, and didn't look back all summer! It's warm again this year, not that ware...yet.. but it won't be long!
oh.. what's a silverbeet?
Janice

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il Wed, 14 Apr 2004 23:30:16 -0600, Janice ha scritto:

Chard to you :-) we also use it for spinach too. because we never used to have that commonly. But now we can get bok choy and lots of differents greens including real spinach.
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Ohhhhhh, taste kind of soapy .. but at least they have them in gorgeous colors now.. yellow, orange, pink, red and kind of blushes between them. ;-)
Janice
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il Mon, 19 Apr 2004 08:48:30 -0600, Janice ha scritto:

Soapy? Have they bred the tannic flavour out? I've got a bunch of those coloured ones patiently waiting for me to plant them out, eventually ...
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Not soapy at all, to my tastes. "Bright lights" is the variety with all the colors. I love it and plant plenty of it each year. It's just about the perfect plant, IMO. It looks great, it tastes great, it keeps going in the heat of summer, and lasts long into the fall. (I harvest individual leaves, not the entire plant.)
Now cilantro--that's soapy!
cheers, Sue
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il Tue, 20 Apr 2004 11:05:39 GMT, "SugarChile" ha scritto:

I was just going to plant it for winter. :-)

Darn, I've forgotten what that is in English.
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I tried Bright Lights last year and the stalks were gorgeous in the seedling tray but some of them turned white when I moved them outdoors. Am I missing something in my soil? Maybe there was too much sun or water? Any insight would be appreciated.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com writes:

Mine kept their color the first year but when seeded back, few kept color. That first year, however, they were certainly bright and pretty (as well as good).
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To save seeds over time, in the end you have to plant them and collect the next seasons seeds. It's the only way with seeds that aren't viable for long. I do a search on 'seedsavers' 'seed banks' and see what comes up. There are groups around the world who do just that to keep species alive. And lo and behold, a nice .edu site :-)
http://csf.colorado.edu/perma/stse/handbook.htm http://csf.colorado.edu/perma/stse/store.htm
http://homepage.tinet.ie/~merlyn/seedsaving.html
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Old_codger,     Our input would be if you are looking to start saving/storing seed for fear of a time when seed stock for growing is no longer available we would suggest a multi faceted approach of the other replies.     Buying off the shelf packets of seed at the end of the year for cheap cheap is a great option for low cost however as has been somewhat stated it can be a crap shoot. Some will save and some will not but in a survival situation you arent going to be throwing a tantrum if your leeks dont sprout. You will eat whatever comes up. So we would say go ahead and build a library of seeds from the garden center and try to rotate out all of the oldest every couple years with new. This way you will always have, at the least, 2 years garden in your library. The plants you grow from these packets may or may not be viable for saving seed but they will at the least provide you with food to eat and preserve. In our experience when we purchase lots of cheap packets at the end of a season, each year that passes germination is reduced by 50 percent though there are exceptions in both directions. I wouldnt want to even remotely rely on packets saved for several years for my food supply though they are a great adjunct.     To start saving your own seed and building a never ending self generated supply of seed you will want to start growing "open pollinated" or "heirloom" plants in your garden. They are the same with the only difference being that heirlooms are varieties which are at least 50 years old. As was stated, many of the garden center varieties you buy can be hybrids which means any one of a number of things can happen when you save the seed from these plants. They may be sterile and not germinate at all, you may get only one strain of the cross, they may not produce fruit, or they may grow fine for a couple years and then fizzle. Hence crapshoot.     Be forewarned however that certain seed can be pretty tough to save and additionally some vegetables are biennials which makes saving seed difficult in some climates.     That said, if you really want to insure that you will have viable seed for growing it would be best to grow a season or two's worth of seed every year. This way you have fresh seed for the next two years and should be safe. Simple crops like tomatoes, squash, zucchini, cukes, melons, many peppers, sunflowers, beets, are easy to save seed from with the right procedure and a few fruit will provide you with LOTS of seed. Lettuce and spinach are simple to save seed from as well. Other than new varieties we grow our own lettuce, spinach, from saved seed every year.     All of the seed catalogs offer many open pollinated and heirloom varieties additionally a google on "heirloom seeds" will find you many suppliers of strictly heirloom seed. www.seedsavers.org is a good resource as well as books like The New Seed Starters Handbook by Nancy Bubel are good.
Good luck, Mark
old_codger wrote:

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Depends on the seed. Some die immediately (... coffee), some can sprout after hundreds of years (... mullein).

What kinds of vegetables and root crops do you like?

You want heirloom seeds. That is, NON-hybrid.
Hybrids, well, they work if you have nothing else, and if you have a steady supply to buy more when what you have is gone, but be aware that hybrid offspring will look nothing much like the parent(s).

Your local garden center / feed store. They'll have types that thrive in YOUR climate.
What you really want is to get a garden going. Then you can see in practice what you're now asking in theory. And the best way to keep seeds, long-term, is on a succession of live plants.
Nothing to do with preserving, so I've removed that bit.
Henriette
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Henriette Kress wrote:

I do a garden every year but it's just veggies, peppers and the like. No grains.
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old_codger wrote:

The seeds in bird feed generally sprout, and are edible. (Not real palatable.) Not any good for bread unless you add the right grains, but they'll do for supplying calories and baiting in quail and dove.
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There is a very good book about grains. 'Small Scale Grain Raising' by Gene Logsdon that could give you a good insight into grain crops. And your Agricultural Extension office as well. Almost all of their literature is free. And their advice as well.
JonquilJan
Learn something new every day As long as you are learning, you are living When you stop learning, you start dying
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 20:30:32 +0300, Henriette Kress

I don't know where the original poster is located, but this sure hasn't been true in my experience in several states in the northeastern USA. Local garden centers have a very, very poor selection of seeds and not particularly suited to the area either.
To the O.P.: since you have (or someone else has, maybe) included 'misc.survivalism', I will assume you want to keep these seeds a long time for some survivalist purpose or other.
If I wanted to do this, I'd buy non-hybrid garden seeds dry-packed in cans for very long storage. For the grains, you can just buy grains that are sold for people to eat: also in cans or 5-gallon buckets, and nitrogen-packed, suitable for long storage.
One place that carries such seeds and grains, packed in cans is:
http://www.waltonfeed.com
This would be a good place for your initial purchase.

Right. This is absolutely correct.
Pat
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Humm I didn't see the various News group names until I agreed to allow posting to all of them, which I don't usually do.
misc.survivalism,rec.gardens,rec.food.preserving,rec.gardens.edible
    Janice

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On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 18:38:45 -0600, Janice

This was originally posted to misc.survivalism. I added the other groups, The first time I tried to crosspost, the darn computer farted before I was finished.
n.

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