seeds

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I am tired of buying seeds from shops. My main goal with gardening was to get away from the evil that is "money", yet all gardening projects seem to begin with buying seeds and bulbs.
I have managed to grow potatos and garlics from previous years' crops, and would like to continue this trend with other species. I will be trying some courgette seeds I saved from a marrow last year, but am interested in other plants, like onions, carrots, etc.
The problem? Most books give absolutely no information about this. Onions, for example - I have found very good advice on growing them from seed to edible vegetable, but nothing beyond that.
In fact, most books I have seem to think that a vegetable is useless once it has gone "to seed" (which is never exlpained).
So - My question is: how (and when, and how much, etc) do I save the seeds from one year to the next of the major species?
Kae
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get away from the evil that is "money", yet all gardening projects seem to begin with buying seeds and bulbs.

would like to continue this trend with other species. I will be trying some courgette seeds I saved from a marrow last year, but am interested in other plants, like onions, carrots, etc.

for example - I have found very good advice on growing them from seed to edible vegetable, but nothing beyond that.

it has gone "to seed" (which is never exlpained).

from one year to the next of the major species?

Hi Kae
I recently joined a group called Seeds of Diversity whose mandate is
"We are a non-profit group of gardeners from coast to coast who save seeds from rare and unusual garden plants for the purpose of preserving the varieties."
I just copied this from their website at http://www.seeds.ca /.
They also have several publications on how to produce and preserve seeds. However, I can't comment in them bacause I haven't ordered them yet.
Hope this helps
Dan
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Kae Verens wrote:

Look here------ http://www.seedsave.org/issi/issi_904.html
Bill
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Bill Bolle wrote:

Very handy! Thank you.
Kae
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away from the evil that is "money", yet all gardening projects seem to begin with buying seeds and bulbs.

would like to continue this trend with other species. I will be trying some courgette seeds I saved from a marrow last year, but am interested in other plants, like onions, carrots, etc.

example - I have found very good advice on growing them from seed to edible vegetable, but nothing beyond that.

Kae,
Google is your friend. Type in "seed saving" (without the quotes), 539,000 hits in 0.64 seconds. Lots of links to available publications as well as on line info.
Ross
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On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 21:40:23 +0000, Kae Verens
(Is it possible you could adjust your newsreader to post with a line length of oh, say, 65-70 characters? Your posts are very difficult to read.)
seedsave.org is excellent. I haven't explored the whole site, and I'm sure it's mentioned somewhere, but much seed-saving is dependent on growing 'open pollinated' or 'heritage' varieties, Many veg are hybrids which will not breed true. That is, you won't get the same variety you saved seed from, but some combination of its ancestors.
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Frogleg wrote:

sorry about that - I use so many different computers for my work, I'm never certain of the settings. This one is set to 72, which I think is the average. I'll check others as I use them.

it all seems a bit complex, but I'm sure understanding will come ;)
Kae
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Kae Verens wrote:

hehe - this one is /apparently/ set to 72.
looks like I'll have to manually break for this one (Mozilla)
Kae
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wrote:

Lookin' good.

This may help a bit, 'though the subject is flowers.
http://www.laeom.com/f1hybridseedproduction.htm
If you really want some details,
http://tinyurl.com/2jecj
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Hi All, there is a book called [ the royal horticultural society , propagating plants ] a Dorling Kindersley book, www.dk.com isbn 0 7513 0365 8. this is a very good book it will tell you all you need to know about saving seeds and much more. I hope tis is of some use to you.
Richard M. Watkin.

get away from the evil that is "money", yet all gardening projects seem to begin with buying seeds and bulbs.

would like to continue this trend with other species. I will be trying some courgette seeds I saved from a marrow last year, but am interested in other plants, like onions, carrots, etc.

for example - I have found very good advice on growing them from seed to edible vegetable, but nothing beyond that.

it has gone "to seed" (which is never exlpained).

from one year to the next of the major species?

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il Wed, 03 Mar 2004 21:40:23 +0000, Kae Verens ha scritto:

year to the next of the major species?
Well, there are books about "Gardens for free", that will describe all the different ways of plant multiplication. But seeds are fun. If you start with a commercial plant, the chances are the seeds will revert back to whatever the hybrid's parents were. Which may or may not be a nice plant. I let all my veggies go to seed (this was a mistake with fennel). And let them drop on the ground. But far better to collect them :-). There are sites on the web that give information.
--
Cheers,
Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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Lets try this again :-) Note the groups that were added. n.

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North wrote:

Ok, thanks north. I think Alan Connor posted something on this a while ago but I can't seem to find it. We'll see what the other groups can add.
Thanks.
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You might give the yahoogroup "Organic Homesteading Gardening" a try.
http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/organichomesteadinggardening
As for me, I hit the garden supply store when they have their big end of year sale. I buy the regular seed packs (envolopes) and I store them in a jar with a few O2 absorbers the lid sealed tight of course and kept in the dark. After 5 years the seeds still sprout and grow, YMMV. I think the trick for long term seed storage is the same as long term grain storage, where O2 and water are the enemy (alone with light).
I have no clue if the seeds I buy and store are non-hybrid or not and if their seeds will sprout. I just buy enough seed to last 20 or so years, of course I rotate these every chance I get (while we still have places to buy seeds, ect...)
n.
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North wrote:

What do you buy. Just a mix of veggies and grains?
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As long as you keep the seeds dry they will last a long time. I keep mine in a plastic one gallon container in the fridge and have viable seeds that are up to ten years old. You can even freeze them if you seal them in a container, used to keep heirloom field pea seeds that way. I keep all the seeds in the containers in paper envelopes, the smaller batches in el cheapo coin envelopes, the rest in el cheapo small size mailing envelopes. YMMV
George
old_codger wrote:

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On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 12:18:14 -0500, George Shirley

yup.... 'cept lettuce, parsnips, think orach seed doesn't keep either. Usually they only last the season they're purchased for, no longer. Maybe if there are way better storage facilities than most households, you might get another year out of them, so you'd have to grow them out each year and save new seed.
Janice

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Janice wrote:

We buy lettuce seed for less than a dime a package, leaf type, and I have some that are two years old in the box. Planted some for spring and got about 80% germination, which with lettuce seed is more than adequate.
George
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 18:38:46 -0600, Janice

I don't know about parsnip and orach seeds' longevity, but I routinely use lettuce seed that is several years old - it has very good germination.
Pat
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in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com, snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com at snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com wrote on 13/4/04 6:02 am:

So what is orach? My ignorance always amazes me. Ellen
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