seeds

Going to try and start some hot pepper seeds again this year. Last year near the beginning I got lots of mold. I also did not soak. Took over 6 weeks before I goy any sprouts. Too cool downstairs. I'm going to try a tray and use a cover this time watching wetness, upstairs where it warmer. Any tips? Greg
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Ventilation? not too much, otherwise they will dry out. I experienced some mold too from excess moisture. Finding the right balance by trial and error. A light timer on a fan may do the trick. That's on my list for germination season.
Cheers
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Bottom heat, peppers need at least 70F to sprout well and 6 weeks is not unusual for some peppers.
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Pepper seeds can be slow but did you check the dates on the package? Sometimes the age does not mater but other times it makes all the difference in the world. Unfortunately you don't know until after they are planted. Not all harvested seeds, as in from actual peppers you had, will germinate at all. Also, white fluffy stuff that looks like mold may not be. Sometimes the chemicals in the water surface and look like mold. Allow your water to "rest" uncovered for 24 hours before using it. MJ
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I bought them assuming they were good. Very expensive ghost pepper seeds. I got this summers seeds this time. I have had good luck planting the plants in pots. I moved the ghost peppers up on my deck to get further away from garden and the stink bugs. Funny thing, the stink bugs do not like my standard yellow habanero plants. They like sweet peppers and jalepeno plants, and to a lesser extent, ghost pepper.
There was a simple experiment done by someone I know. He found the temperature of the roots, hotter, made hotter peppers. I was thinking the pots would get hotter, but they require more watering.
Greg
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gregz;946810 Wrote: > Going to try and start some hot pepper seeds again this year. Last year

> warmer.

they don't cost very much, and I have got good germination rates even with "trickier" species such as rocotos (Capsicum pubescens). What I've had poor germination rates with are old seeds. After planting, drench the surface of the compost with a copper-based fungicide to discourage damping off, and remove the individual seed capsules from the propagator shortly after they have germinated, as they are much more prone to fungal problems while they are in there. (And sometimes the seeds do go white and fuzzy just before they germinate, so don't worry about that.)
--
echinosum


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Hi Guys, i am new to this forum and found this thread so thought i would add my thoughts..
I grow alot of chillies each year, this year will be around 200 plants (by the time i have finished) or 40 or 50 varieties. i start them in a heated propagator set to around 25 degrees, this is because most of the plants i grow are classed as super hots.
I use peat free jiffy pellets for germination as they are easy to handle and give good results, i have started this years seeds and already have over 50% of them pop their little leaves up :)
this is the first year for many years i am not using a T5 propagation light to get them started but they are in a sunny window so all will be fine i'm sure.
i do not feed my plants until they start to get flower buds on them and then they get 1/3 strength tomato feed a maximum of once a week until they start to set peppers then i increase the strength of the feed..
I usually get a very good crop of chilli peppers in all shapes and sizes :)
--
Chilli-Geek


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