Seed potatoes

With exception of having more to plant ,what is the purpose of cutting seed potatoes into halves or quarters? thanks hlb
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Potatoes have many "eyes" (spots where sprouts occur). If too many eyes sprout those resulting sprouts become crowded, reducing yield. Man has discovered that 2-3 sprouts work well for maximum production, thus the cutting before planting helps out as well as producing additional "seed".
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Steve Peek;917703 Wrote: > "HL B123" snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote in message

>

> "seed".
I think cutting the seed before planting helps in producing well and more!!
--
Blackberry


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Would that be at the expense increased disease rate by cutting them. Pros and Cons here?
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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The plan is to cut the potatoes, dust with sulfur, and then allow the cut surfaces to dry (2-3 days) before planting. Cut and plant is a recipe for rot.
--
- Billy

Dept. of Defense budget: $663.8 billion
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In article

We used to cut them and let dry AKA cure for 3 or 4 days.
http://www.lhgarden.org/organic-info/42-potato-planting-advice.html
Here is a sulfur calculator for folks with PH and water issues.
http://www.garden.org/calculators/?q=form&type=sulfur
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"The best fertilizer is the gardener's shadow." - Anon
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Nad R wrote:

from what i've seen in the buckets of scraps, don't worry. those buggers don't rot easily.
i've got plenty of peels that were cut and immediately buried that are still viable and sprouting months later.
the only thing i would be worried about if there was any apparent rot to start with. trim that off and you'll be good to go.
songbird
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songbird wrote:

I hope so , I didn't read the instructions , just cut n buried .
--
Snag
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Hmmm...
What a crowd... I do not cut, I plant them whole. No sulfur or waiting. Do I get the yields, probably not. But does that bother me... No.
I toss the hot potato to others now :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Nad R wrote:

Hey , at least this year I actually went and bought seed taters . Last year I planted some that sprouted in the pantry - great foliage for a few weeks , then ... they just died .
--
Snag
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (HL B123) wrote:

    ->Pre-cutting<-, when appropriate, produces stronger, less crowded plants; increased yield; maximum utility of seed stock. From this site, <http://www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/htmpubs/2412.htm :

    Much more information about selecting storing and cutting seed potatoes there, too.
--
Derald


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