Roundup questions

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Steve, IIRC you started this thread, so I'll address this to you.
"Mulching will get rid of most weeds, but Bermuda grass and its allies and bindweed will come up through any mulch, sooner or later, except for 6 overlapping layers of cardboard, covered well beyond the grass border by heavy black plastic, maintained for at least a year." -- Organic method primer update: A practical explanation : the how and why for the beginner and the experience (Conservation gardening and farming) (Hardcover) by Bargyla Rateaver (Author) (Amazon.com product link shortened) 6018/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid43186938&sr=1-1
€ ISBN-10: 0915966018 € ISBN-13: 978-0915966011
Organic Method Primer UPDATE Copyrightฎ B.<& G. Raieaver 1993 Chapter 6 Weeds pg. 93 -----
Looks like you can prep for next year, but this year looks like you have your work cut-out for you.
Shelly occasionally comes up with useful information but he has almost a pathological need for self-aggrandizement and/or denigrating posters.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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I've got a serious bindweed problem myself, but after a few years of cardboard, the shoots that make it through are much smaller and more easily removed. I think the cardboard just stresses it out after a while. Either that or, since the ground is covered, the bindweed is no longer needed to protect it.
One thing I noticed, though, when I had thick tangles of bindweed in between my raised wooden beds in my first year of gardening, is that they were FULL of spiders. I'd step into a patch and a dozen spiders would start crawling up my leg. And I had NO bug problems that year. So maybe it's worth having around for some reasons! --S.
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Yeah, bindweed and Bermuda grass have chlorophyll and need sun light to survive. If you live where it gets hot in the summer, black plastic blocks out the sun as well as holds in the heat.
". . . since the ground is covered, the bindweed is no longer needed to protect it."
Huh?

--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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wrote:> ". . . since the ground is covered, the bindweed is no longer needed to

Bindweed and other weeds grow when the earth is exposed. It's nature's way of keeping the earth covered and protected. Before I started using cover crops to cover the bare earth, the bindweed took that job. --S.
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Now, now. Ya'll settle down. I should have not acted as newsgroup policeman. Rather, I should have allowed Brooklyn1 to see what I'm talking about on his/her own. In retrospect, it was not polite. It may have been embarassing to him/her to expose that folly. I would expect so by my observation his/her subsequent reply's substance. I should have left well enough alone. My apologies to him/her.
I'm a "him" if you choose to address me by the way.
--
Dave



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What have you been sniffing, Roundup? I own two acres, which I spray here and there for weed control. I am starting a garden, and wanted to spray a little in there to get ahead of the weeds.
Did you get it that time, Sparky?
Steve
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On 5/23/2009 10:11 PM, SteveB wrote:

Don't waste time and effort answering. There are a few flamers out there who insist on always having the last word, replying to everything but actually reading very little. Use news-reader filters. I do now, and my blood pressure has returned to normal (about 120/65).
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Drip irrigation is the best invention, EVER. Because of it, I get to plant my entire front yard in corn, tomatoes, and cucumbers, and only have to work about ten minutes a day on it. --S.
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"Suzanne D." wrote:

Ten minutes a day... you must hold the record for the smallest garden.
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Not at all. My entire front yard is about 60 feet long. (I've got 120 hills of corn, and about 100 cucumber plants along the front fence.) My back yard has eighteen 3X6 foot raised beds, plus a six-foot round 3-tiered herb garden, and a bean house that is about 10 feet on each of four sides. And I have about 20 fruit and nut trees, plus odd vegetables stuck randomly throughout the yard, such as on trellises and along the decks. (I like edible landscaping!) Watering the majority of the garden takes as long as necessary to turn a couple of spigots, plus hand-watering three or four of the beds every day. Of course, the initial laying-down of the drip lines took a long time, but now that everything is in place, it just takes a few minutes to make sure everything gets watered. --S.
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I've had gardens for several years when I lived in Louisiana. My wife is a type A personality. So, when it come time to do the garden, she's out there, tilling, and making rows that are on a slant, following the slant of the property. The water runs right through her ditches, and very little stops for the plants. Couldn't or wouldn't take in the idea that even rice paddies are made to stairstep down the mountainsides. I have taken the second half of the garden, and am about through tilling it now and removing weeds. But I am making my rows at ninety degrees to hers, and using black flex pipe with drip irrigation.
So, we'll see whose does the best. Outside the garden, we have about a dozen trees that have bubblers and moats. Tomorrow, I will put wire around the entrances for rabbits, and plant melons in the moats where they will be automatically watered.
Might even put a picture up on flickr for brooklyn1.
or not.
Steve
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wrote:

It used to drive sheldon/brooklyn wild when you would post pictures to alt.binaries.pictures.gardens and then reference that here. He couldn't get the group and would raise hell about posting them on tinypics or sumpin.
Charlie
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Who pissed in your Wheaties?
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news:KURRl.1176

I always wonder the same thing. I hear so often of people growing their own vegetables because they don't want the chemical-laden crap that you get tat the store, yet they plant them in plots that have been chemically treated, and sometimes even use pesticides around them. Why not just save the expense and trouble and get them at the store? --S.
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SteveB wrote:

If it's really Bermudagrass, the only way to get rid of it is to move :) That said, Roundup works great in a vegetable garden.
Have you considered "no till" gardening? If your ground is full of weed seeds, when you till it they will wake up and you'll get a fresh crop of weeds.
Consider spot-treating the perennial grasses with Roundup, digging up the thistles and dandelions, and contolling the rest with mulch.
Best regards, Bob
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Before using Roundup in your garden, you may want to look at http://todayyesterdayandtomorrow.wordpress.com/2007/06/08/censored-news-t he-lethal-dangers-of-roundup-made-by-monsanto/ . Bermuda grass is a tough nut to crack. Roundup may be the only cure for Bermuda grass but I wouldn't want to eat from the garden it was used in. You might try solarization (clear plastic), but it won't help you for this year but you might be able to clear an area for next year. Throwing cardboard at it may eventually exterminate it, if you are vigilant. You may not wipeout the Bermuda grass but you should be able to get a harvest. And heads up on thistles and dandelion, they have deep taproots and improve poor soil. See: http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Taraxacum+officinale and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion
You might want to identify the thistle before you pull it. http://www.pfaf.org/database/search_name.php?ALLNAMES=thistle
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- Billy
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On 5/22/2009 10:06 AM, SteveB wrote:

In contact with the soil, Roundup decomposes and is no longer effective after about 3 days.
I don't use Roundup broadly. I have used it to spot treat certain weeds, most recently Scotch thistle. Neighboring plants were not affected.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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If you're asking will it kill plants that you plant where you sprayed - no. It only kills what it lands on.
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Steve
We have a weedspray on our domestic market made from pine oil which dehydrates weeds that is certified organic. Not sure if any use to you or if available in your part of town. Worth a squiz though he. This stuff is not systemic so will require reapplication but might knock down grasses to the point where they give up and die. Will not poison your soil I believe.
rob
http://www.eproducts.co.nz/index.cfm/products/organic_interceptor/index.html
http://www.nutraingredients.com/Consumer-Trends/Organic-pine-tree-extract-to-control-weeds
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Think of Bermuda grass along the same lines as the movie "Terminator". It never, ever stops. You can't ever kill it entirely. It always comes back with a vengeance.
Roundup is only temporary. Does not affect this type of grass's root system. Overlays such as plywood, newspaper and the like, it just either penetrates it or goes around to the perimeter. Just my personal experiences.
Even the newsgroup website link pointer fanatic is confused here.
--
Dave



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