Raised Beds Questions

Hi, I am planning on putting in raised beds for my edible garden next spring. I want to use 2" x 12" x 10' untreated boards but am unsure how wide to make the beds. What is a good workable width? Can I grow all edible vegetables in raised garden beds or are some best directly into regular garden beds? Are raised garden beds more productive than regular garden beds? TIA
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g'day rosebud,
i make mine app' 1 meter wide (3' to 4'), and 6 meters long maximum. that width allows you to reach in half way from either side. i don't need to walk on my beds so get no compaction so need no digging.
len
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happy gardening
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len gardener wrote:

Thanks
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It depends. Access from one side: 3ft or less. From two sides: 4 ft. In time I got organized so that I seldom lean across the bed to do anything. I think I am now ready for 5 ft beds.
Can I grow

Raised beds help with those veggies who like well-drained soil, say, garlic or most root crops. They are best when one has heavy soil, and almost useless in very sandy soil. In my very sandy soil, for example, I am certain that some veggies would do better without. But raised beds provide a natural container for all the organic matter, they save your back from overexertion, they mark clearly a no-step area (not that it matters, the soil is very light regardless), and they at least provide several inches of pH-neutral soil on top of acidic soil
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i like to make my raised beds 4 feet wide. i also like to plant marigolds and other bee-happy plants on the perimeter to ensure that my veggies and fruits get pollinated.
pat
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Patskywriter wrote:

Thanks for the marigold tip. I'll be sure to try that.

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snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (simy1) wrote in message

to follow up. I have always left a brick in my beds anyway, because the longest is 30ft long and I don't want to walk a mile. When i need to cross, I step on the brick. However, in time I have learned to plant things so I don't have to cross (except for tomatoes, so I always have a brick at the end of my tomato patch).

Example given: if I had some normal beds and some raised beds, on, say, heavy soil, I would put all the water thirsty veggies (say, celery and radish) in the normal ones, and all those who need drainage in the raised beds. There are limits of course. In my case, for example, beets require neutral soil and water, so I get disappointing results with them. Ultimately, unless you have a deep, fertile, neutral loam in full sun in a maritime climate, there are only so many veggies one can grow well in a given location.
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simy1 wrote:

Thanks for the tips. I've printed off your reply.
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