Raised bed ?

Many sites indicate to not grow brussel sprouts where cabbage or broccoli grew the year before. The same advice is given for other vegetables. My current raised beds consist of sandy loam and compost about 1/2 and 1/2 and a small amount of vermiculite. Since I'm using raised beds and will be fortifying the soil at the end of the season with compost, manure, sand, and vermiculite, does this advice apply?
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I don't know specifically about brussel sprouts but the reason behind any advice about growing a species in the same spot year after year has to do with the buildup of organism or bacteria in the soil. Unless you are trucking the soil away and replacing bacteria will remain. If you amend it, bacteria will remain.
This is a tough issue for me cause I don't have much space so rotating plants can be difficult. Every spot I have has had nightshade variants(tomatoes, peppers or eggplant). SO rotating meaning opening another plot. I also mixed tomato/pepper with broccoli/cauli which was said to be a poor pairing because they need different amendments and soil ph.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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| Many sites indicate to not grow brussel sprouts where cabbage or | broccoli grew the year before. The same advice is given for other | vegetables. My current raised beds consist of sandy loam and compost | about 1/2 and 1/2 and a small amount of vermiculite. Since I'm using | raised beds and will be fortifying the soil at the end of the season | with compost, manure, sand, and vermiculite, does this advice apply?
Rotating crops from year to year is a good idea b/c it keeps the soil from being depleted and inhibits pest populations from gaining a toe hold. In small gardens, that/s sometimes not practical and/or possible. As long as you keep amending/enriching the soil and keep after the bugs, you shouldn/t have any problems.
--
TQ



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Plants that come from the same families share the same susceptibility to diseases. Common families include the cruciform vegetables (cabbage, collards, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, mustard and others), the nightshade family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant) and alliums (onions, garlic, chives, shallots). The most insidious diseases are fungal. Once fungus spores are in the soil they are very difficult, if not impossible, to eradicate, even with amendments. For that reason, it is recommended that plants from the same family are not planted in the same place more than two years in a row.
You might get lucky and never have an infection. This is unlikely. It is better to keep track of what and where you plant. Rotating crops isn't just an old wives' tale. It is based on experience. Good luck, and may your plants be disease free!
Angela
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to nutter.
If you add lime, or have a limy sub soil you van get away with it. check fot lumps at the roots of any brassica ( cabage family ) after this season. If you spot them, no cabage next year. otherwise you can take the risk.

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