Question about fertilizers.

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David Hare-Scott
wrote:
Fertiliser burn is caused by high concentrations of soluble salts, typically this is nitrogen salts because they are found in most fertilisers and they are very soluble but you could get the same from say potassium salts.
David, sorry to have to use this wacko's post to reply to an old discussion about whether only salts from commercial chemical fertilizers can burn plant roots, or whether they can be burned by ammonia from decomposing proteins as well. I was rummaging around old "postings", and found this.
It is part of an ancient discussion that Fran and I had about the merits of fresh vs. aged organic fertilizers (poop).
Newsgroups: rec.gardens.edible Subject: Ping Billy Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2008 18:54:34 +1000
<snippity, snippity, snip>
The Rodale book of composting By Deborah L. Martin, Grace Gershuny <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=N6sx5-OM_psC&pg=PA123&lpg=PA123&dq=N PK+%22fresh+manure%22&source=web&ots@vqJHGGn4&sig=i3jd5aL_vv2kQE0cegX6u vfsoe8&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result>
I have found the Rodale books are good ones so what it said made sense to me.
It says of fresh vs rotted/aged manure that: i) in the composting process, manure can lose up to half it's moisture content and thus concentrate nutrients ii) nitrogen in composted manure is fixed whereas in fresh, it's soluble iii) solubility of P and K is greater in composted manure and on P.125 it says
that "when manure is added directly to the soil, it generally releases highly soluble nitrates that behave similarly to chemical fertilisers,
** as well as ammonia, which can burn plant roots and interfere with seed germination." **
--

I would have liked to taken the credit for finding this quote, but we
can't know or remember everything, and that is why we are here, to get a
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BS:...
"...that "when manure is added directly to the soil, it generally releases highly soluble nitrates that behave similarly to chemical fertilisers"
Really little billy?
Seems its the Ammonia Hydroxide concentration breakdown from fresh manure that "burns" plants. So why does this organic chemical behave similarly to "chemical fertilisers" ?
Hummm? So I wonder if the chemicals might be similar because they ARE the same? Wouldn't it be weird to discover that organic stuff you worship so much makes the very salts as the devil Chemfertie thingie you so ignorately use in your old think hippie political diatribes? Wow, that would be weird and make your many stupid cherry picked Amazon “citations” so ….well, ignorant comes to mind.
So again, David tops ya billy.
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