Question about 2-stroke engines

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I now have 3 tools with 2-stroke engines: a mini-tiller, a weedeater, and a leafblower. They all require different gas-oil ratios. One is 50:1, one is 40:1, one is 30:1 !
Can I mix 40:1 and use it for all 3? Will it ruin anything?
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Will it ruin anything? No.
Steve
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il Tue, 26 Apr 2005 14:33:01 +0100, "shazzbat" wrote:

Well if I wanted to keep my machines in good order forever, I'd go by the rules. What is needed is an easy way to mix the different ratios. Of course in metrics it is waaay easier to do those ratios.
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(3) 1 gallon plastic gas cans = $10 (3) gallons of gas = $7 US (1) Quart oil = $2 A black market and roll of masking tape to label = $1
Cost to protect $500 worth of power equipment = $20
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FriscoSoxFan wrote:

I'm with you. I have two two-cycles that use different mixes. Easy enough to do and I'd rather use what the machine is designed to run with. That way you're not going to be burning extra oil to foul things or run it to "lean" and chance burning parts out.
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as picky as you might think. An old geezer I used to know ran his chainsaw on 50:1 instead of 25:1 for the better part of two years. I pointed out to him that he should double the dose for 25:1 and he did, but no harm seems to have been done. Admittedly he only used it occasionally, but you get the picture.
Steve
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shazzbat wrote:

Hogwash. Using a non-standard ratio is a good way to cook an engine. Some one with two-stroke tuning experience can tune the engines that take 50 to 1 to run on a richer mixture but don't go the other way.
Tony
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Thanks...I'll go the extra yard and make 3 mixes. I also didn't know you were supposed to dispose of old (as in last year's) mixes. I just learned that from my Mantis manual.
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 22:55:07 GMT, Mitch@this_is_not_a_real_address.com <> wrote:

Use stabil.
Especially if you won't be using the fuel very quickly.
sdb
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Sylvan Butler wrote:

Yup. I use stabil all year in my mower, snowblower, weedwacker, tiller, and chain saw. When I put them into storage for a season, I make sure that the tank is completely full. I used to do the same thing (except constantly using Stabil) with my Corvette's and motorcycles and have never had a problem with any of them. (Well, that was caused by the gas anyhow. ;-) )
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g'day mitch,
i go with use what the manufacturer recommends, it probably would be ok if yo ran them all on 30:1 mix just that in the 50:1 machine it may foul an extra plug in a season.
when i was a mechanic i always recommended to folk not to mix whole cans of 2 stroke mix as once oil is added the mix then deteriorates with time. myself i use a calibrated jar and a calibrated medicine cup and mix my 2 stroke fuel as i need it, no problems then of not having fresh fuel and no problems with having to dispose of old fuel.
len
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happy gardening
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 13:16:11 GMT, Mitch@this_is_not_a_real_address.com <> wrote:

Are any still under warranty? If so, you should put the proper mixture in that one to avoid any warranty claim problems.
My personal practice is to use the mix with the most oil (e.g. 30:1 in your case) in everything. If I had problems with carbon fouling or excess smoke, that would indicate too much oil and I'd have to reduce. No problems thus far (over 25 years with many brands of 2-cycle engines both mine and the first 10 years my employer's).
I also _always_ use Stabil in the gas for my 2-cycle engines. And Stabil in the gas for 4-cycle engines late in the season when they may not be used again for some time. Never a problem with seasonal storage since I started that practice ~7 years ago.
sdb
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Sylvan Butler wrote:

This will work if you tune the carburetor to let in more fuel into the mix. Pre-mix with more oil in it is thicker and results in less fuel into the engine causing a lean running condition that can lead to piston seizure.
I agree with 100% with using fuel stabilizer in the off-season.
Tony
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il Wed, 27 Apr 2005 06:22:10 GMT, Anthony W wrote:

My motorcycle had instructions for storing that involved removing all oil and fuel, but since I never stored it I never read it too thoroughly. And that was a four stroke. Old fuel gets kinda sticky I've noticed. And a car left in the driveway for a year or two will rust in place - those brake linings can suuuure stick!
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Loki wrote:

Some motorcycle manuals have some rather lame advice in them. If you store a bike for the winter, drain the carb but leave the tank full. This way the tank won't rust out.
Come spring drain the gas into a can and put it in your pickup truck. Then start the bike with fresh gas..
Tony former motorcycle mechanic Owner: OregonMotorcycleParts.com
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Anthony W wrote:

Never done that with any of my bikes and haven't ever had a problem
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Steve Calvin wrote:

You probably live in a dryer climate than Oregon... Here an empty steel gas tank will rust over winter and Ive seen many half full tanks rust above the fuel level in storage.
Tony
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il Fri, 29 Apr 2005 05:36:24 GMT, Anthony W wrote:

Not to mention an empty fuel tank can be more dangerous than a full one (fumes). But the rate our prices are going up, I may just store petrol at the bank!
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Loki wrote:

No fooling. I'm fortunate (or not) to have a ford V8 truck that will eat most any gas that I put in it. I've used it to dispose of all sorts of less than fresh gas (mixed 1/3 with 2/3 fresh.)
I won't run my 1100 Yamaha on gas more than a month old. If I don't ride it over the winter, its gas goes into the Ford.
Another way to go would be to drain the entire fuel system then put a few ounces of 2 stroke oil in the tank and throughly splash it around to protect the tank from rusting. My tiller and boat motor have plastic fuel tanks so I just store them dry.
Tony
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Anthony W wrote:

Nope. I live in New York in the Mid-Hudson Valley. Dry? *Far* from it. When I was getting ready to put the bike or Vettes to "sleep" for the winter I'd always run the tank to at least 1/4, then add stabil and fill up with the highest octane I could find and run it long enough to make sure that the carb/lines were full of the stabilized gas. Put 'em away on a Battery Tender Plus and that was it until I took 'em outta mothballs in the Spring.
I do the same thing with all of my equipment. Full tank and stabilized fuel for storage and forget about them. No problems with any of 'em.
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