Pumpkins

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I have Hundred Weight pumpkin seeds and intend to try and grow some whoppers with the kids this year. Does anyone have any tips on growing giant pumpkins they'd like to share?
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DavidofWales


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On Feb 17, 9:46am, DavidofWales <DavidofWales.

No personal experience here but I have always heard that you pick one pumpkin early on and get rid of the rest.
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In article

Some gardener in Pennsville watered his pumpkins with milk.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 14:46:44 +0000, DavidofWales wrote:

Have a big yard.
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'
I was going to try too. I had some home roasted pumpkin seeds last year that were coated in olive oil and roasted in the oven on aluminum foil until toasty. Awesome. Same person made a couple of pumpkin pies.
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Got folks know about lady godiva pumpkin seeds?
http://masdudiable.com/2010/01/23/edible-pumpkin-seeds /
BTW to the OP with a large yard look at Tahitian Squash sort of a sweet carrot 2.5 feet long by 5 inch diameter that stores well at room temperature.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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Guess what, The ones I ate were roasted shell on. I ate the shells. Didn't know.
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A common practice and labor intensive ;))). I used to eat them and they were white with salt. Fun to eat and spit out.
A good reason to grow your own below.
<(Amazon.com product link shortened) />/ ref=sr_1_3?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid97980536&sr=1-3>
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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-snip-

'stores well' doesn't tell the whole story. These buggers are 10-15 pounds [or 8-30 if you believe these guys; http://www.seedsofchange.com/garden_center/product_details.aspx?item_no=S10676 ] and are supposed to store 'on the counter' after you cut a couple pounds off. http://articles.latimes.com/2007/oct/31/food/fo-market31
Damn you Bill!! I just lost 100 sq feet of garden to a new 'experiment'.<g>
Jim
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[in a thread from this past spring]

Haha--- 100 square feet was a bit optimistic.<g> OTOH- I'm planting them again next year. Thanks Bill-
I'm in zone 5/6 so I planted 6 seeds in the basement under lights 3 weeks before planting time. 3 sprouted and were transplanted to a hill. One survived. [I don't know if the woodchuck or something else got the others.]
It apparently didn't like the hill site, as one night it took off and went 10 feet east to the bean trellis. It was so entangled with the beans by the time I noticed it I just let it be.
After climbing up and over that trellis it went to the next one. [and pulled it down.<g>]
I only harvested 2 squash - but it seems to be most of what it claimed to be. [though my squash were small] One was 7 lbs- the other about 4/5. The flavor is mild, but otherwise like a butternut. I cut off a pound on Sept 11 -- It really does just 'heal itself up! I cut off another pound 2 weeks later.
I just finished the big one. Cutting off a pound every couple of weeks-- then slicing off 1/2" to clean up the 'scabbed' end worked fine. It got a little 'sweeter' as it aged.
The second squash remained on the vine until Nov 1 or so--- I've got a lot of other squash to eat, so we'll see how long this one keeps before cutting it.
Jim
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I layer shelled pumpkin seed on in a toaster over. Light sprinkle of soy sauce. Then abour 400 F. till the snapping is almost done. Better to err on the early side. Addictive.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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DavidofWales wrote:

Good deep soil with lots of manure, full sun, plenty of water especially when it is hot, mulch well, long hot growing season and keep the fungi at bay. Thin out the set fruit to only a small number.
David
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And take off the last foot of the vine when it reached 5 ft long as that encourages the vine to set fruit.
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FarmI wrote:

Don't we want a big vine feeding only a few fruit? I would let the vine run and keep thinning as they set.
D
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There is that, but given that the OP is trying to grow these big things in the UK, I'd be trying to get a fruit on the vine as early in the season as possible.
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It is not the vine that feeds the plant, its the roots and manure is not going to supply the needed N for this growth. As for pruning I would follow this guy's advice:
http://www.backyardgardener.com/wcgp/tips/10steps/10steps.html
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Gunner wrote:

Both of these statements are rather misleading.
The roots absorb water and minerals which is necessary but not sufficient for strong growth. The vine (stems, leaves) feed the fruit in the sense that for growth the leaves are required to do photosynthesis and the stems are required to carry the carbohydrates produced by the leaves to the fruit for them to grow. It actually makes more sense to speak of the manufactured carbohydates as food rather than fertiliser as food but both are common usage. With cucurbits you can also get nodal roots which are an asset as they supply water to a big vine along its length which helps to reduce wilting in full sun, thus allowing photosynthesis to continue longer on hot days before the stomata start to shut down.
Manure will supply sufficient nitrogen if you use the right sort. Bird manure and rabbit manure are high in N. I would use an appropriate mixture.
One could also use foliar sprays of chemferts if you wanted to go all out. I didn't mention this before as it is not my usual practice when growing pumpkins and it may be a little trickier to do for the novice. It's up to the OP.
David
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That would depend on the direction you going or how your reading track, dont ya think?...
We are talking manipulating plants to grow Giants here David, Your tweaking this puppy up as much as you can. Hundreds of methods/ examples out there to do that..no reason.. just picked this one because he Power Points (visual) and has street creds and perhaps see it from a different perspective:
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/2568819/How-to-grow-Giant-Pumpkins
Roots and shoots. Set em up for the big race. I'm sure your methods might work well.

Yeah......and yet not so much with pumpkins as other cucurbits, right? Regardless, these nodes are nothing but a pipeline pumping station for the vine's apical dominance wanderlust. Stop that. Also the extraneous leaf area is a water waster to the tune of several gallon a day. So If you dont need them, don't spend the energy to operate them. Again it is not quantity you seek , but quality, your tweaking this. Extraneous vines and leave distract from that goal.

David, again the man is fueling up a giant pumpkin for the big race. You could very well run it with the biofuel blend, tweaking it as you go or since you spent all this effort to set it up for these conditions. you go with that you know works well, get the nitro out.

I thought that was the point, to go all out! But chemfertsthats a "really, billy". Still splitting hairs to get to the same point. Im of the camp it not so much what you use, but how you use it.
As for foliar sprays? Maybe? just never been in my regime since reading this: http://www.puyallup.wsu.edu/~Linda%20Chalker-Scott/Horticultural%20Myths_files/Myths/Foliar%20feeding.pdf
G
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'David Hare-Scott[_2_ Wrote:

I've since found out, let the flowers form and remove all but the largest.
I read by Alan Titchmarsh if you bury the vine it will root and uptake even more nutrients for the fruit that have set.
Can't wait to try!
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DavidofWales

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I do know that the guys that grow the giant pumpkin contest winners feed them milk when they get big, for whatever that's worth.

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