protein in cow manure

Page 1 of 2  
does anyone have an idea of how much protein is typically found in cow manure?
--

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lobortis volutpat
commodo. Morbi lobortis, massa fringilla adipiscing suscipit, velit urna
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I don't eat cown manure so have never been interested in it's protein level. I've only ever been interested in the NPK.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

heck I don't eat plenty of things, but occasionally I'm curious about other aspects of food other than it's taste
but thanks anyway
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

I think Fran's point (she may correct me) is that as a gardener one is not interested in foodstuffs or their components, like protein, as inputs as one might in the cases of say stockfeed or your own diet.
<finds nearest soapbox> Plants are autotrophs, that is they don't eat, they take in fairly substances (air, water, minerals etc) and photosynthesise more complex substances using sunlight energy. Those complex substances may be food for organisms that do eat (heterotrophs) like cows and us. The inputs we are interested in, NPK and other elements, are often loosely called "plant food" which can be confusing in comparison with animal nutrients such as protein, carbohydrates etc as the two are not similar classes of substances nor do they have the same role in metabolism. Gardening terminology is also loose in talking about inputs as elements when to a chemist none of them are present in the form of elements but as compounds and molecules.
This leads us to the case of N (nitrogen) as a plant input which is what I think you were asking about. Although it is four fifths of air plants cannot absorb N directly as nitrogen gas is a molecule of two atoms (N2) and that molecule is extremely stable and chemically inaccessible to the plant. So plants need some help to absorb N. This can be from microbes that fix nitrogen, such microbes can take in N2 from the air and produce useable N compounds. Often such are symbiotic with plants as in legumes. Plants can also get N as compounds as part of synthetic fertilisers, manures and composts, and from rain during electrical storms. This is why the N component of manures in its NPK value is of interest not the protein content. <descends soapbox>
If this was not the point of your question ask and I will try again.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<ascends soapbox> Uh, you forgot the amino acids that come from micro-organisms, which is what organic gardening is all about, i.e. the feeding of micro flora and fauna. <descends soapbox>
--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Billy wrote:

That's true but the context was inputs not stocks. Once present the microflora act as a storage and exchange medium but the OP cannot feasibly add microflora to his soil as a source of N for the whole community.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in

:-)) Now that is a far more technical explanation than I'd have given.
But I agree with your summation. IF I ate any of the cow poop I put on my plants or considered the poop to be human 'food', I might want to know it's protein content. Or if one or more of our cattle were ill, I may be interested in protein passed in the animal's faeces. When it comes to cow poop I use on my plants, however, I am only interested in the NPK of the poop.
(And I too wondered if the OP really might have meant to ask about the N content of cow poop. But that was not the question asked even though asking that question of other gardeners would make sense whereas asking about protein didn't. Given how many trolls we've had here in the past who knows what prompted the OP to ask such a question.......)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I asked about the protein in cow poop in reference to a discussion in another group, which sadly, I have forgotten. it wasn't a troll and I'm sure that one day I'll remember the point. I did some research and nothing came up. I thought here was a good place to ask. It is/was, it's only my memory and my failure to read all my newsgroups in a timely manner that makes the whole thing seem senseless/pointless at this time.
but my intentions were good
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since you say you weren't trolling (and we have been bothered by such creatures here in the past), you may get a result if you just do a general search about protein in the poop of any mammals.
Someone (David I think) mentioned that a healthy cow shouldn't have a lot of protein in it's poop. If he is right, and past history indicates that he doesn't post unless he's either sure of his facts or puts in a qualifier, then perhaps the same principle would apply to all mammals.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unless the animal was sick, most of the protein excreted would be in the form of bacteria. Most of the excreted nitrogen would be urea.
--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

There have been news articles about synthetic food from manure. I took such reports as using manure as a source material for growth not as a direct source material for the chemicals.
Using manure as a source material for growth is normally called a garden. ;%) Using manure to feed a culture that makes meat-like-stuff is more direct but still the same general process.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Hare-Scott wrote: ...

i would be interested in a good list of studies done on actual nitrogen uptake from soil using tagged sources (radio isotopes?).
so far in my readings i have come across one study mentioned (which i didn't follow up on) that said very little of applied nitrogen from chemical fertilizers actually is taken up by plants, but that it must act somehow by freeing other nitrogen in the soil/organisms that plants can take up. this was consistent for both the first and second year after application...
so i'm curious if anyone else has gotten into this topic beyond the surface?
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't like my thumb-nail on organic gardening? The ecology of the soil encapsulating the life and death cycles in the microorganisms, as well as their symbiotic relationships with the garden plants is what nurtures plants naturally (think slow release). One of the problems with chemical fertilizers (chemferts) is that they are water soluble. Clay in the soil will mitigate this to some extent by ionic bonding, but, by and large, the the chemferts get washed away to become someone's else's problem (blue babies, ocean dead-zones).
--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

or what?
Ammonium ions are positively charged and therefore stick (are sorbed) to negatively charged clay particles and soil organic matter. The positive charge prevents ammonium nitrogen from being washed out of the soil (or leached) by rainfall. In contrast, the negatively charged nitrate ion is not held by soil particles and so can be washed down the soil profile, leading to decreased soil fertility and nitrate enrichment of downstream surface and groundwaters.

The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan <(Amazon.com product link shortened) 583/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid06815576&sr=1-1> (Available at a library near you, as long as they remain open.) p.45 - 46 Hungry for fossil fuel as hybrid corn is, farmers still feed it far more than it can possibly eat, wasting most of the fertilizer they buy. Maybe it's applied at the wrong time of year; maybe it runs off the fields in the rain; maybe the farmer puts down extra just to play it safe. "They say you only need a hundred pounds per acre. I don't know. I'm putting on up to two hundred. You don't want to err on the side of too little," Naylor explained to me, a bit sheepishly. "It's a form of yield insurance."
--

And so it goes.
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Billy wrote:

nitrogen isotopes used in studies of actual nitrogen uptake by plants.
yes, the fate of applied nitrogen compounds, but actual studies of tagged compounds using nitrogen isotopes.
i've come across only one reference so far in my readings and was wondering if anyone else here had come across any other studies of this type.

yes, but this is different than what i am asking about.

songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm. Bit tricky that. Natural Nitrogen (N) consists of two stable isotopes, nitrogen-14, which makes up the vast majority of naturally occurring nitrogen, and nitrogen-15. Stable huh? Well they're out.
Fourteen radioactive isotopes (radioisotopes) [radioactive! That's more like it] have also been found so far, with atomic masses ranging from 10 to 25, and one nuclear isomer, 11mN. All of these radioisotopes are short-lived, with the longest-lived one being nitrogen-13 with a half-life of 9.965 minutes. Nine minutes? You'll have to be quick about your experiment ;O))
All of the others have half-lives below 7.15 seconds, with most of these being below five-eighths of a second. Oh, how the time flies!

In any event, most of the applied nitrogen salts go straight down the drain, and are wasted on the garden, and pollute the environment, even if they do turn a profit for fertilizer companies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_nitrogen
--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Billy wrote:

ah, but that is ok, just that if most natural nitrogen is N14 then you use a high portion of N15 and then track how much of that gets adsorbed. this must be what the experiment i saw in passing did because they didn't say anything about it being difficult or very short term.
or they were using other atom isotopes for tracking... can't say for sure.

heh, good to know.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oxygen, and carbon and what the ratios tell us about past weather conditions (I've forgotten).
There is also <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotope_analysis#15N> which talks about predators elevating N15. Perhaps it will ring a bell on what you're trying to remember.
Good luck,

--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, but it will be proportional to the nitrogen in the manure.
<http://www.plantea.com/manure.htm Manure Chicken Diary cow Horse Steer Rabbit N 1.1 .257 .70 .70 2.4 P .80 .15 .30 .30 1.4 K .50 .25 .60 .40 .60 Sheep Alfalfa Fish Emulsion N .70 3 5 P .30 1 1 K .90 2 1

--
E Pluribus Unum

Know where your money is tonight?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

If the cow is healthy not much protein at all. There are some nitrogen compounds though that are useful as plant nutrients. If you particularly want to increase the nitrogen content of your soil bird manure (chicken, turkey, pigeon, etc) has much more N compounds than cow but be careful as it will burn your plants when fresh or if applied too heavily, whereas cow is not likely to.
http://www.primalseeds.org/npk.htm
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.