Potato Planting

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Yes they do. Never. I think I may be a goat:~))
Steve
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FWIW- my new potatoes (red) have just broken ground here in NC. :)
Craig
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:34:59 -0700, "Greg"

That's a sweet potato. It will work with a sweet potato. It won't work with an Irish (or white, or regular) potato, as far as I know. Better to buy seed potatoes at a nursery or garden center.
Sweet potato: suspend a sweet potato in a glass or jar of water, pointy end up, with about half of the sweet potato in the water and about half out of the water. You can suspend it by toothpicks (which tend to break) or nails (which works well).
The sweet potato will get sprouts - shoots - all over the half that's not in the water. There will be quite a few of them. When each shoot has some leaves and is ...oh...[shrugs] maybe six inches long, you can twist it off the sweet potato and plant it in the ground AFTER ALL DANGER OF FROST IS PAST AND THE GROUND IS WARM.
Even so, you're not going to know what variety of sweet potato will be growing and maybe it wouldn't be suited to your area. You'd be better off to buy small sweet potato plants - these are called 'slips' - of a variety which might do well in your area.
Alternatively, you can plant the whole affair in a large pot and have a pretty vining house plant, or a pretty vine for your front porch in summer. It wants a sunny location, of course. And this won't produce you any sweet potatoes.
Pat
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il Thu, 08 Apr 2004 11:45:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com ha scritto:

An 'irish' potato?? They come from the americas...
;-)
--
Cheers,
Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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On 09 Apr 2004 16:53:22 +1200, "Loki"

I know. Nevertheless, we in the USA often call them 'Irish potatoes' to distinguish them from 'sweet potatoes' (_Ipomoea batatas_) which are much used here.
After all, the Irish have been known to eat a few potatoes, just occasionally. :)
I doubt that what we call 'French toast' actually comes from France either. It's good though.
[Digression] My husband (who is British) had never heard of 'French toast' until moving to the USA. In case you don't know what it is either, and are curious - it's a breakfast or brunch food, usually.
Beat an egg or two or three with a fork. Stir in a few drops of vanilla or almond extract or both, and a couple of teaspoons of sugar. Pour it into a flat type of pan. Put slices of white bread in the egg mixture and allow them to remain there for a few minutes, so some of the egg mixture soaks into the bread. Saute the bread in oil or melted butter until nicely golden with brown flecks, turn, and repeat for the second side.
(I generally eat 100% wholewheat bread, but - to my way of thinking - it doesn't work for French toast. I use white bread for French toast - or French bread or Italian bread sometimes.)
Serve hot. We usually serve it with a little butter and some maple syrup (a little warmed honey could substitute).
Instead of maple syrup, it's also very nice with a pat or two of butter, a couple of sprinkles of lemon juice, then sprinkled with confectioner's sugar (icing sugar). [End digression]
Pat
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Steve
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2004 21:24:31 +0100, "shazzbat"

Just asked him: Yep. :)
Pat
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And, if I'm not mistaken, back in the 1500's it was known as "pain perdue" in England.
Scoop
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il Fri, 09 Apr 2004 10:32:27 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com ha scritto:

'potatoes'

As does the whole world now. Although rice is making a resurgence.

--snip--
We used to have it as kids in Australia, but added milk to the eggs. We knew it as French toast from my father (also English)
The French have a really revolting habit (to my taste) of dunking and leaving old hard bread into the morning large cup of cafe latte and then eating the soggy mass with a spoon. I've adopted the cafe latte for breakfast but no way am I ever going to eat totally soggy toast from a mug!

Like wholemeal pasta (a crime).
Perhaps you'd like curried toast? Put curry paste on toast and cut into fingers. Leave out the chafing dish, I don't think it's so necessary despite what Mrs Beeton says. :-)
--
Cheers,
Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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ha scritto:

:-)) Steve
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il Sun, 11 Apr 2004 21:46:50 +0100, "shazzbat" ha scritto:

Nope, not us. We call them swedes, I've even 'cut' them in the falling snow. I doubt if anyone in NZ knows what a rutabager is. (weird name) :-)
lessee what else do we have ... chickpeas, silverbeet, capsicums, courgettes hmm can't think of other names that might be different, oh right mince beef instead of 'ground'. :-))
--
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Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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No, not you. I was referring to the Americans.
I'm going to visit NZ when I win the lottery. I've always wanted to go there.
Steve
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il Tue, 13 Apr 2004 12:01:20 +0100, "shazzbat" ha scritto:

ahh i see, the attribution at the top confused me. You have more chance to save your money :-)
--
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Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 12:01:20 +0100, "shazzbat"

Rutabaga . aka .. Swede Turnip in the USA.
Janice
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On 13 Apr 2004 19:00:28 +1200, "Loki"

It's 'rutabaga' (ending in an 'a', not an 'er') and it's from the Swedish word for the vegetable.

We call chickpeas 'chickpeas' or 'garbanzos', silverbeet we call 'chard' or 'Swiss chard', capsicums are 'peppers' here.
Pat
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il Tue, 13 Apr 2004 09:08:23 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@meadows.pair.com ha scritto:

ty
yep, the good cookbooks use all names and measurements. Rutabaga still seems such a weird looking word though. :-) But I have no problems with canola replacing rape seed, aside from it being a prime GM/GE crop along with soy.
--
Cheers,
Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
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French Toast is well known in Britain and I wouldn't be at all surprised if it was in fact a British recipe in origin. It appears in a lot of my older British cookbooks.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 17:19:32 +1000, "Fran"

read somewhere recently it was first known mentioned in a Roman cookbook.
Janice
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2004 12:34:59 -0700, "Greg"

PS - you'd be much better off getting a couple of basic books on gardening at your local library, rather than listening to the person at Home Depot.
I recommend 'Square Foot Gardening' by Mel Bartholomew. If you read his book, also see his website for some updates, one of which is important and makes things much easier.
http://www.squarefootgardening.com
His way of doing things is *not* the only way to do things, but if you follow his directions carefully, you *will* have a successful garden, right from the start.
Many many people leap into gardening without learning or reading about it first, then of course, they usually have discouraging results and quit. Such a shame! Reading even ONE basic book about gardening can save you a lot of wasted time, effort, and money.
Pat
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Thanks everyone for the great advice!
Greg Elsasser

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