Please identify this plant

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My garden is full of these plants, my Jamaican gardener says that these are edible but he doesn't know what they are called here. Does anyone know what these are<
http://picasaweb.google.com/bjoshuarosen/Mystery_weed #
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 23:16:25 +0000, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

I just tried it, it cooks up and tastes kinda like spinach.
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General Schvantzkoph wrote:

I don't know this one but there are 5 or 6 plants of a similar habit that grow around the world that are locally called "spinach". Maybe if you do a google image search for spinach.
David
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You shouldn't do that, improperly cooked it is quite poisonous. The common name is poke salad. It should be boiled in at least two changes of water and then cooked to tenderness. It was once canned and sold commercially by a cannery in Arkansas, but they can't get enough pickers any more. If you get sick get to the hospital. The poison is water soluble and I believe in the oxalate group.
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On 6/25/2010 7:16 PM, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

I don't know but this looks like a neat site to try:
http://weedid.aces.uiuc.edu /
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if I saw that plant in my yard here in Florida, I'd call it "poke" and know it to be edible until the stems and petioles turn magenta. Best eaten young prepared as any other tender, mild potherb. Mature poke leaves are often bitter. Poke is a tender perennial, the roots of which survive sub-freezing temperatures but I don't know for how long. I have a couple of pokeweeds in my "yard" that are at least 10y/o; one of them is over 10' tall. This link will give you some idea what the climate's like here: <http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/weather.php3?refer=&sh437 If youallow these to mature and make their berries, you will become legend among migratory birds and poke will become more commonplace in your neighborhood but even with the help of birds it is not particularly aggressive. I allow volunteer poke plants to remain proximate the garden as a trap for armyworms, "tomato worms", etc. until I get tired of walking around them (they get pretty big, after a while).
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the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 20:41:28 -0500, balvenieman wrote:

I'm in Massachusetts.
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 20:41:28 -0500, balvenieman wrote:

I hope it's not Pokeweed, the Wikipedia article claims it's poisonous.
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wrote:

Read my comment above! IT IS POKE WEED!!!
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On 6/25/2010 8:58 PM, Steve Peek wrote:

Was actually my first thought but pictures of mature plant looked different. This one looks the same.
http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/photos/pokeweed.jpg
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from green colored to magenta colored. At stage, the plant is so bitter, even after prolonged cooking, that consuming a toxic quantity is not likely. The berries induce gastric distress in people but birds love them. As I indicated, pokeweed near the garden makes an excellent trap crop for all manner of crawley munchers. Here's the USDA profile and a range map: <http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PHAM4 .
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the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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On Sat, 26 Jun 2010 08:38:22 -0500, balvenieman wrote:

Thanks for the info.
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says...

How'd it go.
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On Sun, 27 Jun 2010 06:42:29 -0500, phorbin wrote:

Fortunately I had boiled the hell out of it before I ate it, boiling removes the toxins although you are supposed to boil it twice and I only boiled it once. I didn't have any symptoms but that's the last time I eat any unfamiliar plant. My gardener had told me that he eats this all the time but he is from Jamaica. I suspect that they have a different plant that looks like pokeweed.
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<http://www.holisticonline.com/herbal-med/_Herbs/h284.htm
<http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Phytolacca+americana
<http://pokesaladfestival.com/plant.htm <http://www.lostcreekwitch.com/tag/pokeweed/
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- Billy
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He probably identified it as a relative of a Jamaican variety of pokeweed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callaloo
I did a bit more poking around and it's range through several varieties runs from Canada right through South America.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pokeweed
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On Sun, 27 Jun 2010 11:33:56 -0500, phorbin wrote:

I always knew that this is the way people died from mushrooms, they learn to identify safe varieties on one continent and then they go mushroom picking on a different continent and they mistake a deadly variety for a similar appearing but unrelated variety from their home country. There was a case recently here in Massachusetts where some Russians poisoned themselves when they ate some Death Angel mushrooms that they found in their backyard. My father told me a similar story when I was a child about a little boy who had stolen mushrooms from a neighbors garden, that night the family had wild mushrooms that they had picked in the forest but as punishment for his crime the little boy wasn't allowed to eat any. The mushrooms were poisonous and every member of the family died except the little boy. For the last 50 years I've wondered why my father told me that story since the moral of the tale is that crime pays. I assume the reason he told me the story was because it was something that he had just read in the newspaper and not because he was conveying a twisted morality to me. My take on the story was to confine mushroom picking to the produce aisle of the supermarket. I never realized that the lesson extended to green plants also, I didn't realize that there were any deadly leafy plants growing in North America, now I know better.
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Now that you know better, please don't try the wild carrots. Some of them could be hemlock! Steve
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says...

Whichever way you turn it, the morel of the story is a little twisted.
I'd figure that if there was a message, he wanted you to latch onto the idea that death, even if you think you know what you are doing, is ever present ...and that this little boy was left completely alone in the world for his crime.
A cruel, ironic punishment for a child.
There are a number of edible species with toxic lookalikes.
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preparation, you might find this worth a look: <http://www.wec.ufl.edu/faculty/sievingk/Sustainability%20Readings/EdibleWeeds.pdf
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the Balvenieman
"You know what they say: Once you kill a cow,
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