Plant I.D. needed.

Plant whose tag got lost two years ago are starting to bloom. http://tinypic.com/1r509n5u The first plant (plant_1) has reddish stalks and looks like a mint. The second plant has large leaves. Any ideas?
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- Billy

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Billy wrote:

This looks the same as last time. Where am I looking this time?
David
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Just below the pictures it says "Latest Albums". Click on the album name "Unknown Plant". I navigate by clicking on "Albums" below "TinyPic Member" and across from "Home". Thanks.
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Billy said:

The mint with reddish stems is...some sort of mint (Mentha). What does is smell/taste like?
The other plant looks like a some sort of burdock (Arctium sp.).
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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In article

No descernable smell or taste.

Bingo, Arctium lappa - L. I don't remember planting it, and it certainly didn't flower last year. Thank you, Pat.
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wrote:

Yep, second plant is definately burdock, I raise it for the seeds, leaves and roots to use as a supplement for blood sugar control. The whole plant can be used for this. The seeds also contain a high percentage of essential oils.
If I remember correctly, burdock will not bloom the first year it is planted, mine have been coming back from some of the roots that get left and produce seed every year. Might not work this way in a colder climate.
Burdock can be quite invasive, if you don't wat it spreading clip the seed heads before they began shedding seed.
basilisk
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I'm beginning to think that this is Scutellaria serrata. Can anyone confirm or refute that identification?

Looks good that the large leaves is Great Burdock.
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wrote:

Could be. I grew skullcap for a couple of years before it died out. It looked a lot like that but it's been quite a few years. Next time you're stressed out, make a tea. If it calms you down, it's probably skullcap. <g> (I tinctured up enough that I don't need to grow it for another year or 3. Good herb, skullcap.)
Kate

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wrote:

There are a half dozen different skullcaps. Some are VW Bugs and some are Ferraris. Scutellaria serrata is the wheel barrow. Scutellaria baicalensis is the Ferrai. One of my suppliers screwed up. Drinking a cup of this, would only send a mild mannered person into a towering rage (if they were expecting baicalensis). As far as I can tell, it is an ornamental, and a poor one at that.
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wrote:

I grew Scutellaria lateriflora, which is I believe the most common variety for medicinal uses.
Kate
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wrote:

It would be in your neck of the woods. Scutellaria lateriflora is also known as the "Virginian Skullcap" (Antispasmodic; Astringent; Diuretic; Emmenagogue; Miscellany; Nervine; Sedative; Tonic) and seems to be of the same quality as Scutellaria galericulata, a.k.a. "Common Skullcap"(Antiinflammatory; Antispasmodic; Astringent; Febrifuge; Nervine; Tonic).
Then there is Scutellaria baicalensis, Anodyne; Antibacterial; Anticholesterolemic; Antipyretic; Antispasmodic; Astringent; Cholagogue; Diuretic; Expectorant; Febrifuge; Haemostatic; Laxative; Nervine; Sedative; Stomachic; TB; Tonic.
http://www.pfaf.org/database/search_name.php?ALLNAMES=Scutellaria
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