ping Nad R & Billy

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Nad - I've been reading a book from the "River Cottage Handbook" series and thought you might be interested since you too seem to be interested in bread baking. I'm going to buy a copy when I can figure out how to buy the one that was for the UK audience not the US, but the one I am reading is specifically for the US market.
Billy - you may be interested in this because of a brief mention of the introduction of the 'Chorleywood bread process' whihc is worth reading aoubt if you care about what you eat.
Daniel Stevens is the author - the US version of the has 2 loaves being turned out of bread proving baskets, whereas the UK version just has a pile of loaves on the cover: http://www.randomhouse.com/book/200804/the-river-cottage-bread-handbook-by-daniel-stevens
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Ordered from the library.
What's the difference between the British and the American books?
Apparently, Donna Leon's books have been printed in every language, except Italian, the language used where she lives.
There is also a video series about Venetian Commissario Guido Brunetti, in German, "avec sous titres".
--
- Billy
America is not broke. The country is awash in wealth and cash.
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Seems that they are a series of "River Cottage" books on the country life, similar to the "Storey's Country Living" series that are popular here in the US. The book does look interesting, like Peter Rienhart's books on bread making does not completely dismiss the use of Mixer Machines but teaches not use that much. What I not going build is a brick oven. But they are clay cloche for oven use that I have not tried to use.
I do have to count my pennies these days and I have bread books already. I did put the book in my wish list. The series of books looks very interesting.
I do have my sourdough starters going now that the temperatures are warm enough to grow them. I do not keep the temperature high enough during the winter for the starters. Fresh bread oder that fill the house is a pleasant thing that allot people are missing out on.
Badly needed rain is coming. It has not rained much here last three weeks, my rain barrels are empty. Watering with the well for most of garden. First too much rain and now too little. The well water is not the best for my plants.
Like other usenets, postings are way down across the boards. People moving to FaceBook forums from I have read... Something I will probably not do :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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be given> wrote:

What about borrowing them from a library? I have done that to see if I want to own them and I've decided that I will (and I need yet more cookbooks/how to books like I need another few holes in my head).
Peter Reinhart has a comment on the back of the bread book and he says: "This book is not only beautiful and inspiring but it also adds new bread-making ideas and formulas to the lexicon. It definitely goes on my 'must-have' bread shelf."

My house is as cold as a step-mother's breath in winter (right now) but I'm still trying to get a sourdough started as a result of being inspired by this book. I have the batter sitting on a cake cooling rack on the top of our wood burnign kichen range which tends to stay warm all night even if it sometimes goes out if we go to bed too ealry or dont' get up early enough.
Fresh bread oder that fill the house is a pleasant

It sure is. I made 2 loaves today, by hand. I gave my bread machine away years ago becaseu i was not impressed with the product from it and have made bread by hand ever since. We've made to occasional foray into bought bread but our our latest baker has got new staff and his bread has gone from sublime to boring - back to my loaves again.

Gee,a whole 3 weeks. I wish I got rain so frequently ;-))
Watering with the well for most of garden. First

No, I won't me either. I mightt use online forums, but I doubt that I'll even bother with those once usenet finally dies.
BTW, the preserving book by pam Corbin, looks especially good - I am going to make that the very first one of the lot that I buy.
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Billy wrote:

the movie is not much at all like the books. if you won't read them you are missing the boat (so to speak).
...

for science fiction that does get you wondering again try Alastair Reynolds (almost everything he's written i have enjoyed).
songbird
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all the boats in the world.

Thanks
--
- Billy
America is not broke. The country is awash in wealth and cash.
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I have read around twenty of Robert Heilen's books. Stranger in a Strange Land is an excellent read. I have read well over four hundred science fiction books.
However, after looking at my collect, I have not read one book by Alaster Reynolds. The author will soon be on my purchase list. My current read is "www: wonder by Robert J. Sawyer" it is a blah read second book of three. Before that a couple of Jack McDevitt books was ok not bad. The last excellent read was "The Windup Girl by Paoplo Bacigalupi". Next up would have to be "Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge", I have not been disappointed by any of Vinges books.
But soon to have Alaster Reynolds part of my collection.
A little shower outside right now... It is not much, perhaps a bucket in each of my rain barrels. But better than nothing. First rain here in two weeks, past storms kept on missing me.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Paoplo Bacigalupi seems to have a number of well recieved books.
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I never got impression that you liked Science Fiction? But that novel does have some future ideas of how Genetically Engineered foods may effect the far far future.
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Nad R wrote:

i couldn't guess how many i've read. probably in the thousands. i used to read several science fiction books a week along with the other reading i would do. when i went to the library i would come home with one or two old fashioned paper bags full of books... i'm pretty sure that Piers Anthony, Orson Scott Card and Asimov have several hundred books between them, add Clarke, Webber, Dickson, Heinlein, Saberhagen, Herbert (and now son), Jordan, Kurtz, Lackey, Pohl, Forward, Sterling, ...
my collection was mostly sold off when i moved from up north. i was very close to moving across country and didn't want to haul all of those boxes with me.

i've not really liked much of his writing -- sadly as the topics are interesting. i've enjoyed McDevitts work much more so.

yes, True Names, the Fire Upon the Deep, and a Deepness in the Sky are worth the reads.
being a techie and interested in AI i've always liked any books that are about how computers/robots try to take over the world or are misunderstood. and first contact stories too. i had a nice collection of these kinds along with the cyberpunk authors, but then sold them all off.

i would skip his most recent short work. as that was perhaps the weakest of the lot.

just a short bit of rain here too. storms usually weaken or split when they get to us as this is the valley. today was no exception. north of us had a good bit of rain.
songbird
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Then you will love "Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge".
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Nad R wrote:

i think i've read it, but i will double check next time i get a chance.
songbird
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I like this series.
Lord Foul's Bane (The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Book 1)
12 books in all or at least 9. Not Sci-fi but fantasy. I have a hard time distinguishing the two labels.
"Tell them at Riverstone that there is no help for the land."
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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For the most part it goes like this:
Science Fiction tends to deal in the future. Fantasy tends to deal in the past. Science Fiction tends to have the hero solving a technical or social problem. Fantasy tends to have the hero on a quest of some kind.
I do not read that many books in the fantasy arena. "American Gods by Neil Gaiman" and last book I read from fantasy was book one of three, (2&3) not out yet, was "The Left Hand of God by Paul Hoffman". I tend to avoid authors that have a series of them if know before hand. So I will wait for Mr Hoffman to release the last two novels, however, Hoffman's writing do flow well, it was a good read".
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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I know I've read at least one of them, but I'm darned if I can remember anythign about them/it. Were they vaguely Medieval?
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Present day alternate universe.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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Nad R wrote:

I read SIASL when I was about 20 and thought it was a hoot. I re-read it a few years ago and found it very dated. The "shocking" parts no longer have any shock and while I understand the parody of American religion much better now it isn't as funny. Heinlein never wrote great prose like (for example) Card. Apparently the original version was somewhat censored by the publisher and Heinlein's estate published the full version a few years ago, possibly in an effort to put some punch into it.
David
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I read and have the original version. I suppose gay marriages in the past was a shocker and people that saw someone with tattoos all over their body may no longer have that shocker value. But the beauty of it, he was way ahead of time.
The same with "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" the insight of computers and Artificial Intelligence theories he talks about when people were still using slide rules in those days.
An amazing writer.
I do remember you stated that you were a founding member of a Heinlein fan club?
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Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Nad R wrote:

No
D
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It was a combination of 2 of the books which were widely separated in the series. Although I do agree that it isn't a patch on the books, I found that it really helped me in understandign a lot of the nautical terms, the cramped nature of the boats and the noise and the drama of battle (and I did enjoy seeing 'the lesser of two......' being said by Jack).
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