Pineapple questions

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I heard somewhere that pineapple isn't a real fruit. If I had to guess, I would guess that it's a whole lot like a strawberry.
Anyhow, I found what looks like seeds in the skin of the pineapple. I planted a couple of them yesterday, so if they are seeds, I may know in a couple weeks.
If that's the case, should I assume that growing a plant from the green top of the pineapple will yield a clone of the original plant?
Question two: I had a plant going well, but the inner leaves froze and died because we didn't move it indoors soon enough. The outer leaves are still alive, and the root system is still solid, but there is no new growth. Should I give up on it and toss it out?
Ray
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On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 21:06:45 -0500, "Ray Drouillard"

Usually. Anyone with better info is welcome to butt right in. I've asked pineapple questions here before and gotten very few responses.

Give it a chance. It may send out side shoots and restart from there. Mine do that when I cut the fruit from the top. It may take a while. Possibly up to 6 weeks or so. Check down where the leaf attaches to the stalk and that will be where they come up from.

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wrote:

guess,
I
in
green
I suppose I could google for it.

and
new
Thanks!
It's been more than six weeks, but the temperature and light are both rather low. Maybe it'll do something this summer when I take it out into the direct sun.
Ray
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Just remember, they grow in Hawaii!!!
Please, do, let us know your results You are not the only one to chop the top off of one and plant it! My success has been limited but I never got serious, so I'm curious too.
Same goes for planting the seeds found in the rind... :-)
They are a bromiliad if that helps? At least as far as I know...
http://gardenbed.com/plant/gbd_p_apl1.cfm http://www.pineapplerealty.com/growing_pineapple.htm http://www.plants.flowers.org.cn/Growing-Pineapple-Plants.htm
Ok, so I was bored and went googling... ;-) Hope that helps, AND you post your results here later! LOL!
K.
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On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 18:39:43 -0600, Katra

I've got 20 of them growing but I live in west central Florida. Seems to be rather easy here. They do take about 2 years or so to produce a fruit.
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com (James Mayer) wrote:

Are these from chopped tops ore seeds? :-)
K.
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On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 19:58:35 -0600, Katra

Tops.

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The top grows easily if you keep it moist on loamy soil; if you want it to fruit as a houseplant, growing it on a 15 gallon container would be great; try not to get the night temperature lower than 40 degrees F if you are putting it outside; after two years, it will give you a fruit or two. It will die after the fruit ripens, but will start giving you side shoots, so you can divide them like any bromeliads.
I got it growing outside here in Pleasant Hill , CA - zone 9 but had to be brought inside during a frosty night. They prefer high humidity so if you put the plant near a pond, you will be assured of a beautiful plant.
Benny

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you know, the easiest way to get a pineapple growing is to plant the top part of the fruit in soil. You know, the part that you slice off when you are getting ready to eat one?
I did one several years ago, and hit the cut part with a little bit of rooting hormone. It grew into a beautiful plant that I kept during college, but it never produced any fruit. Still, perhaps you would have better luck growing one outdoors? maybe you climate is better?
John
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May I chime in as a botanist/horticulture person?
A pineapple is not one fruit--it is many fruits. Each little section of a pineapple is the fruit from one tiny flower. The whole inflorescence (+collection of flowers) matures into the juicy, sweet multiple fruit that we know as "a" pineapple. The "core" of a pineapple is the stalk of the inflorescence. In a really good pineapple, that's edible too. Commercial pineapples have very, very small seeds.
You certainly can propagate pineapples from a nice slice with the leaves at the top. You will be taking the growing point of the stem, and in time it may well flower again.
An old trick to induce flowering in bromeliads: Once the plant is fairly good-sized, put it in a paper or plastic bag with a very ripe banana or apple for a couple of days. Ripening fruit gives off enough ethylene gas to trigger flowering, though it may take a few weeks (once the plant is out of the bag) to actually get the flowers.
Trivia question of the day: Why does the Jell-o box say not to use fresh pineapple?
Hope this helps, M. Reed Texas A&M
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Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme that will prevent the jello from jelling. The enzyme cannot withstand heat so canned pineapple is ok.
marcella

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Ding! We have a winner! The same holds true for other enzyme-rich fruits like papaya. I hear that figs and kiwis do the same thing.
Monique
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Doesn't fresh pineapple contain enzymes that "melt" gelatin? :-)
I'd not use fresh papaya either.
K.
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[...]

I tried that once. It didn't set up. Apparently, there is an enzyme or something in pineapple that keeps the gelatin from jelling.
Ray
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:55:50 -0500, "Ray Drouillard"

Bromelain. Similar to papayin, it breaks down protein (geletin). Pineapple juice is a good meat tenderizer.
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Ya know what, I'm glad you mentioned that. ;-) Beef has gone up in price so I can no longer afford my favorite cuts like T-bone and Rib eye, so I settled for some nice chuck steaks the other day for $1.99 / lb.
Now I know what to marinate them in to tenderize those suckers! I'm ok but papasan has bad teeth and won't let me get him to a dentist..... :-P
Katra
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i've got about 30 pineapple plants in various stages of development in 3 - 5 gallon pots along my fence in my backyard. pineapples can be propagated by seed (done mostly by research stations in hybridization experiments, seeds are planted in a sterile gelatinous mix, orchid growers should be familiar with this medium), however it might not be worth the effort. most pineapples are propagated by replanting the crown (the green leafy top of the fruit), slips (green leafy part growing from under the fruit of a mature/maturing plant), and/or suckers (green leafy part growing from various parts of the main plant)...in hawaii these are generally referred to as keiki (children). these will be exact clones of the mother plant, so if you have a good plant, it and its offsprings are keepers. be cautious or wear gloves/hand/arm protection when cutting the keiki off of the main plant as the leaves of the plant are serrated along the edges towards the tips, although they may not cut your skin, they do hurt and watch your eyes as the leaf ends of the plant are rigid and pointed (don't want to poke your eyes out if you have a large plant). plant the keiki in about a half inch to an inch or so of soil and keep moist, don't drown them too much as rotting may occur (root rot or plant rot) but keep in mind that the plant is pretty hardy and rooting occurs pretty easily (and i've tried it in all types of soil from sand to clay). from a mature plant you should get on average 4 to 6 keiki, more or less. fruiting will occur in approximately 2 years. just before fruiting, the plant should turn in color from a deep green to a yellow-green, the middle of the plant (the basket) will turn reddish, and in a few days a fuzzy red ball will be seen protruding in the basket - this is the pineapple flower/fruit. as the fruit developes and matures, it will turn from a fuzzy red ball to a green pineapple. although i've heard of and experimented with many tales of when to harvest, i've found none to be true. what i do is observe the scent of the fruit and it's color, harvesting when its bright yellow with a just hint of or no sign of green and a very sweet, slightly acidic smell being emitted from the fruit. i generally start removing the keiki after i've picked the fruit, leaving one keiki along with the main plant. once the main plant fruits, it will no longer fruit which is why i leave one keiki with the main plant from which if remove the old leaves and remaining stalk since these are now useless. likewise, if you prefer a larger fruit, you must remove the keiki from the main plant or you will eventually have a large plant with many small fruits (this is referred to as sugar pine, due to its smaller size it is sweeter due to its sugar concentration but its a pain peeling many small pineapples). another thing, the plant produces the sugar, not the fruit (like sweet corn) so pick the fruit when you are ready to eat it, don't let it hang around for a few days as sugar loss is occuring. i fertilize the pots about 4 to 6 months on average with a high nitrogen fertilizer since this is a "green" plant. when the plant starts turning color (yellow) then i fertilize once with a low nitrogen, high/higher potassium fertilizer or 16-16-16 (depends on what i have on hand, i'm not that picky) fertilizer. i can't say much about frost/snow/cold effects on the plant as i'm in hawaii. and if you want to know why i plant these in pots, its because i'm always moving them around, depending on the season as the sun moves, which i forgot to mention, pineapples like sun!
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Thanks SO much for taking the time to post this. ;) I have saved it to the hard drive...
We've only played around with growing pineapple tops in the past as a decorative plant as I never thought I could get fruit from them.
Dad just bought a wonderful ripe pineapple yesterday and I cut the top of with about 1/2" of fruit.
It's going to be interesting to see what I can do with it! There were no seeds in this one.
Thanks! K.

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On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 18:31:26 -0500, "Ray Drouillard"

I think you should. There's a lot of information out there, including how to grow a pineapple from the top
"growing a pineapple"
will give you a lot more information that "I think," and "I've heard."
"pineapple propagation" yielded:
http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/pineapple.html
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Don't know if this will help but an online friend of mine from Hawaii once told me to plant them you twist the green part of the plant off and plant it in soil or in a pot. He said that is how he does them, Now I've never tried growing one so I don't really know how well it is. I see other people have suggested about the same thing only cutting it off. Steve
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