pick off early flowers in cherry tomatoes?

OK, I've been growing indeterminate cherry tomatoes for many years. As the vines grow, I always pick off the flowers at least until the vines are tied up several feet high (around May, here in zone 8). My neighbor says NO!, that I actually lose tomatoes in the long run if I pick these first flowers off. My logic is that I want the plants to put their energy into vine before they put energy into fruit. The way I grow them, they end up six feet high with plenty of tomatoes.
What say? Do I save myself the trouble and still get plenty of tomatoes?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Every year I experiment with one thing in the garden. Two years ago it was mulch on half the pepper plants. In july, the mulched plants were twice as large, and much more healthy looking. Last year they all got mulched. I've done the same with my 'maters, plucking the 'sucker' branches, the first flowers <one friend says the same for peppers too> Anyways, I've never experienced any noticeable difference in my garden, so I don't do any of that any more. Try an experiment and pluck half the plants, see if it makes a difference at the end of the year...
Tim
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On Apr 18, 7:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wow I couldn't pick off flowers! I never do and my cherry tomatoes always spill out of the top of a eight foot cage. I let them do what they want and they seem to have _plenty_ of energy and fruit too! Emilie NorCal zone 8
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On Sun, 19 Apr 2009 19:45:59 -0700 (PDT), mleblanca

Yep. Don't waste time and early fruit on plucking.
Charlie
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Ah?
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wrote:

Ah....what???
Charlie, wondering what the hell was in my tea????
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Just plucking around ;O)
I had yellow gentian, chamomile, and fever few tea yesterday. They are all good for inflamation. My god! is yellow gentian bitter. Damn bitter. Lovey-poo was not content. I made another pot of just chamomile. The stiff neck that I've had for three months and had seen a doctor about, went away, and I slept like a rock until my bladder was about to burst (yeah, yeah, I know, too much information). Oh, and Lovey-poos knee, which is where all this started was much better today. Coincidence? Who knows? Who do I trust more, big pharma or weeds? Dumb question, but I still talk to my doctor who is totally ignorant of herbs.
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wrote:

Interesting article...kinda sorta along the lines........
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/02/the-ideology-of-health-care /
I have very good results with cat's claw and turmeric for inflammation. I also use devil's claw for osteoarthritic flareups in me knee.
Cayenne works too. ;-)
Charlie
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http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Chamaemelum+nobile Chamaemelum nobile - (L.)All. Camomile
Medicinal Uses Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. Anodyne; Antiinflammatory; Antispasmodic; Aromatherapy; Nervine; Stomachic; Tonic; Vasodilator. Camomile is a common herb with a long history of safe and effective medicinal use - it is widely used as a household herbal remedy. It is particularly useful as a remedy for various problems of the digestive system, as a sedative and a nervine, it is especially suited for young children[4, 20, 21]. A tea is made from the flowers and this should be prepared in a closed vessel to prevent loss of the essential oils[4]. The flowers are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, nervine, stomachic, tonic, vasodilator[4, 14, 21, 37, 165, 201]. The single-flowered form is the most potent medicinally, though it can in large doses damage the lining of the stomach and bowels[4]. For this reason, the double-flowered form is usually preferred since this contains less of the alkaloid that causes the problem[4]. The flowers are gathered in the summer when they are fully open and are distilled for their oil or dried for later use[238]. They should not be stored for longer than 12 months[238]. The whole herb is used to make a lotion for external application in the treatment of toothache, earache, neuralgia etc[4]. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Its keyword is 'Soothing'[210].
----- http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Tanacetum+parthenium Tanacetum parthenium - (L.)Sch.Bip. Medicinal Uses Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. Antiecchymotic; Antiinflammatory; Antispasmodic; Aperient; Bitter; Carminative; Emmenagogue; Sedative; Stimulant; Stings; Stomachic; Vasodilator; Vermifuge. Feverfew has gained a good reputation as a medicinal herb and extensive research since 1970 has proved it to be of special benefit in the treatment of certain types of migraine headaches and rheumatism[238, K]. It is also thought of as a herb for treating arthritis and rheumatism[254]. The leaves and flowering heads are anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, aperient, bitter, carminative, emmenagogue, sedative, stimulant, stings, stomachic, vasodilator and vermifuge[4, 7, 21, 36, 46, 53, 100, 165]. The plant is gathered as it comes into flower and can be dried for later use[7]. Use with caution[165], the fresh leaves can cause dermatitis and mouth ulcers if consumed[238]. This remedy should not be prescribed for pregnant women[238]. A tea made from the whole plant is used in the treatment of arthritis, colds, fevers etc. It is said to be sedative and to regulate menses[222, 238]. An infusion is used to bathe swollen feet[257]. Applied externally as a tincture, the plant is used in the treatment of bruises etc[7]. Chewing 1 - 4 leaves per day has proven to be effective in the treatment of some migraine headaches[222]. -------
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Gentiana+lutea Gentiana lutea - L. Yellow Gentian
Medicinal Uses Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. Anthelmintic; Antiinflammatory; Antiseptic; Bitter; Cholagogue; Emmenagogue; Febrifuge; Refrigerant; Stomachic; Tonic. Gentian root has a long history of use as a herbal bitter in the treatment of digestive disorders and is an ingredient of many proprietary medicines. It contains some of the most bitter compounds known and is used as a scientific basis for measuring bitterness[238]. It is especially useful in states of exhaustion from chronic disease and in all cases of debility, weakness of the digestive system and lack of appetite[4]. It is one of the best strengtheners of the human system, stimulating the liver, gall bladder and digestive system[238], and is an excellent tonic to combine with a purgative in order to prevent its debilitating effects[4]. The root is anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, bitter tonic, cholagogue, emmenagogue, febrifuge, refrigerant and stomachic[4, 7, 9, 14, 21, 165]. It is taken internally in the treatment of liver complaints, indigestion, gastric infections and anorexia[238]. It should not be prescribed for patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers[238]. The root, which can be as thick as a person's arm and has few branches[239], is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use[4]. It is quite likely that the roots of plants that have not flowered are the richest in medicinal properties[4].
Illusion is the first of all pleasures. Oscar Wilde
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I usually check here first: http://www.holisticonline.com/Herbal-Med/Hol_Herb_Directory_Index.htm
and then look here: http://www.pfaf.org/index.php
More digging tomorrow. Gotta go.
Hasta manana
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... and, now I know what to do with the tomato flowers I pick off in early season. Into the pot!
Thanks!
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