peppers

Anybody have any good recommendations for an "organic" fertilizer for peppers? Not doing to good with just manure this year. Growth is stunted like. I've had lots of blossoms, but only 2 peppers. They have only grown about 2 inches since planting. I have a variety of peppers, sweet & hot. Significant amount of water each day, but not too much. No problem with bugs & other pests, no spots or browning on leaves. All other plants that were planted the same day as the peppers are doing fine, even doubled their size. Just having trouble with the peppers lagging behind in growth. Do they need some other type of fertilizer, or is something else wrong?
thanks for any input, Rachael aka Rae
PS: in south/sandhill area of NC
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Rachael Simpson wrote:

Peppers can be slow to take off, and they do like the heat. If you've had a cool spring, that may be it.
They can also be pretty greedy - are any of the leaves yellowing?
I've used fish emulsion for years. Not 100% organic, but close enough. Slow release and high in nitrogen.
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Cool Spring?
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Billy
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Definitely not cool. We had a long spring and late frost. But the past 3-4 weeks have been 80+. Plants look good in color, just not growing.
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On 2007-06-21 10:09:20 -0400, "Rachael Simpson"

Try hollytone.
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said:

Application, price, etc.............did a search on the 'net, but couldn't find out much. Anyone have experience with this?
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Excellent fertilizer for rhodies and the like made by Espoma. http://www.espoma.com /
I've used their products for years, Rosetone is my favorite for, of all things, roses <G> Feed and grain type stores (farm supply and such) carry it around here, I don't know if the box stores do.
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Hollytone is a mostly organic 4-6-4 fertilizer for acid loving plants. To help increase the acidity, it contains 5% sulfur. The ingredients are: manure, feather meal, crab meal, cocoa meal, corn gluten, cottonseed meal, dried blood, sunflower meal, kelp meal, alfalfa meal, greensand, rock phosphate, sulfate of potash, humates, ammonium sulfate, and triple super phosphate.
Check it out at www.hollytone.com
It is a great product. For rhododendrons and azaleas, I recommend using it once each spring at half the rate on the package.
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Our peppers are a bit slow this year due to the drought. They're just developing flowers now. We have to water them bi-weekly.
Good organic fertilizers are blood meal for nitrogen. Bone meal for phosphate and wood ashes for potash. Fish emulsion can get expensive, smells really bad and can draw unwanted pests to the garden like coons and possums.
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Ok, thanks for the tips on the emulsion, leaning more towards the blood & bones meal now. Already have a possum that's fell in love with my van of all things. Look out there any time of night, and the little bugger is sitting up on top of it. Would be ironic if my van was the one to run over it one day.......
We are in drought also, at least 9 inch deficent. Been keeping them watered though.
Rae
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snipped-for-privacy@intrstar.net writes:

general is that they don't really get going until the weather gets hot. At least here in my corner of the world, they like the warm weather which us western Pacific Northwesterners don't get until now or later.
Patience may pay off well for you and as July gets closer, they will stand up to the plate and be in good shape by August.
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

I'm coming at this slowly. All the above and keep the mulch off until the heat arrives.
Your buddy,
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writes:

Oh the heat is definitely here................
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snipped-for-privacy@sonic.net writes:

Billy, why would you wait to mulch? I ask because one of the main reasons I mulch (usually with newly-mown grass) is so the soil will be warmer. It also seems to promote more and healthier root growth, probably partly because of the increased earthworm activity due to the composting grass. Between the mulch and surface watering (deeply and once a week or every 4-5 days when it's really hot), my results have been good in the past - once the air temperature also is up there.
Of course, there is the added advantage of the mulch keeping down weeds (as well as keeping moisture at the plant's roots). For my tomato plants, by the time the mulch has "gone down" from composting, the plants are large enough to produce shade which also decreases weed activity. Not only does it help the desired plants to grow, it discourages the undesired. Rather than waiting to mulch, I get discouraged because I don't have more grass earlier in the year. I've even mowed the fire alley grass to have more mulch! (Our block has a T-shaped alley as it is actually two blocks, the leg of the "T" provides back yard access for fire trucks for the otherwise not-so-accessible houses but that leg is not paved.)
Anyway, my plants get their mulch early so I am interested in reasons to wait.
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

You got it alright. Your doin' good.
I waited wih my plants until they showed some vigor, especially the corn. I wanted to get the ground warm. I'm using alfalfa, which is light colored when its dry. I presumed I'd be reflecting some of the heat, when I wanted to absorb it. Grass clipping would be darker and probably absorb more heat. Little thing I forgot to include in my advice because I got in a hurry. Everything is mulched now.
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Billy
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My peppers are planted in a raised bed, covered in black plastic. When I plant them I put 3 wooden match sticks in each hole. I was told this by a lady 20 years ago who owned her own nursery and it hasn't failed me yet. It was 45 degrees here last night so my plastic is holding the heat of the day and I have little red chilis already about an inch long so I guessing somethings working for me! I do not fertilize with anything else all summer and usually get quite a yield from my peppers. I have 20 plants in, all different assortments, sweet and hot, red and green. I do not expect any major growth till the nights are warm here, which might be a few weeks away yet here....northern lower Michigan!
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Candidly, I can't see jalapenos producing anything at 2" tall... Must be a midget pepper. Dave
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I don't have an answer Rachael but if I couldn't see a problem, I'd try some B1. If you can get the roots to grow, the rest will follow along. Good luck,
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Billy
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they had only grown an additional 2 inches since being placed out side. No jalopenos either. cayenne, tabasco, peter pepper, hot banana, green bell. Bought the plants at the nursery, didn't have time to start my own this year. In all, from root to top, they were about 6 inches before I planted them. I planted the tomatos the same day as the peppers. Now usually, the peppers and tomatos kinda keep up with each other a while, but this year the tomatos have already tripled their size (as of yesterday!) and peppers haven't done much. I don't know, maybe I just have exceptional tomato plants this year................did get some bone meal to try - haven't had a chance to get out there to put it out yet though. Gonna try to later this morning.
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Area here has had less than usual direct sun. Mostly overcast. The jalapenoes have been lagging my tomatoes as well. Yet, where you live, in drought and sunny conditions, have the same dilemma with other pepper varieties. Jalapenoes are producing here, just short in stature. Grow all mine from seed. Try jalapenoes next year for reference for your other pepper varieties. Save one for seed the following year. Dave
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