pear tree experienced gardeners-growers

have had 2 pear trees for about 7 years now. first tree was bought big enough to produce but didn't. then we found out that a second tree would be required for "proper pollination". we got that one. sure enough the following season there were pears all over the place -to the contented deer around it was heavenly!-. these were supposed to be dwarf trees with red pears, they are neither. they were supposed to have a very smooth skin, they do not. it is as course as i have ever seen and felt. oh, and the pears are much smaller than usual although they are honey sweet. but, as things go, that is what we have. last year, while absent from the place, some electric company assholes -am sorry but cannot find a softer definition for their stupidity- decided to amputate part of the trees "because some branches were on the way of electrical stuff. well! they thought easier to cut the tops of these two trees all the way down to include the culprit branches!!! pear season came and although we had about half of usual pears, they grew to edible size. the problem now is that both trees have develop an incredible amount of upshoots that come out of each branch. all thin and looking to the sky! the strangest look one could imagine. WHAT CAN WE DO A) TO SAVE THE TWO TREES? B) TO GET THEM BACK INTO NORMAL PRODUCTION? C) TO IMPROVE THE CONSISTENCY OF THE SKINS? D) HOW AND WHEN ARE WE TO CUT THESE THIN BRANCHES GROWING UPWARDS? PLEASE HELP!!! GLORIA
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You need to prune 1/3 of the shoots, every year for the next 3 years. You will have to leave some shoots grow into main branches to let the trees rebuild their structure. pear trees go straight up, and every year I have a lot of pruning to do, and it is all upward shoots. I can start fires in the stove all winter just with straight pear sticks.
About the skin, let it go. If the flavor is right, better have them sweet and coarse than sour and smooth. I cook many of my pears for that reason, and the chicken eat pears for about a month. Cooked, they are quite good, but I'd rather have them raw. To have bigger pears, in June go around the trees and thin the fruit to about one pear for 25 leaves. That will double them in size, and also prevent a biennial habit (the fact that they might start producing every second year). I also give them wood ash and wood chips as mulch.

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How do you cook them and what do you add and how much, to the pears for flavor? I put in cinnamon and cloves, but they still didnt taste like I was told they would.
Dwayne
I cook many of my pears for that

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My pears (from very old trees which I got with the property, and that I resurrected over the canonic three years. I cut one of the trees, and it turned out to be 45 yrs old) have flavor, but they are a bit sour for eating out of hand. They are also a bit grainy. However, peeled and chopped coarsely (one quarter, three pieces), and cooked in a pot with just a bit of water to prevent sticking, they turn sweet. I add lemon juice and dried cranberries in the beginning (the cranberries will puff up while absorbing the pear juices). Sugar to taste if there is too much lemon. They are good without, but with the lemon and the cranberries, the whole family swoons over them.
I don't spray or water them (about 20% are unblemished, and those that are blemished go to the chickens), just mulch, prune and wood ash, and they are beatiful in the spring. So not a bad return on the work investment.

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