Peach tree growing problems

Greetings, 4 years ago we planted (did not fo any soil prep) a peach tree. We live in Tampa FL so the soil is sort of sandy. Ever since it seems that the tree does not grow but does bloom some (has not bore any fruit). I guess my soil is the problem. What can I do without removing the tree that will help it along? Also there are a lot of small branches that have formed. Any idea on pruning/trimming my 7 foot tree that is about 4 feet wide? Thanks Greyhound Tampa, FL
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Hopefully you have a Florida peach. Tampa is too far south for standard cultivars. They are usually pretty easy to grow, but are susceptible to insect damage. A couple of tfruit tree fertilizer spikes wouldn't hurt and might help. As for pruning, I just take out a few middle branches so that each branch gets full sunlight.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:22:51 GMT, "Grey-hound"

What variety is the peach tree? Is it a standard, semi-dwarft, or dwarf, or genetic dwarf peach tree? Is it one bought locally, or mail order. Otherwise is it a peach developed for your area, versus one from the north that expects a proper cold winter? I know there are "Georgia Peaches" but I don't know what part of Georgia, or what the winter weather is like in Georgia, how cold it gets there versus where you are in Florida.
Generally, there are many regional differences and you say your soil is "sort of sandy" .. that mean that it's almost all sand? How close is the tree to salt water?
There are many variables, and it's kind of hard to give any solid suggestions without information. Does the ground remain moist or dry out a lot? I have a volunteer peach in my front yard that I couldn't get to or it would have been gone, it kind of stayed small for a couple years, and then a friend dug a trench to get water over to it, it greened right up and started growing taller and wider, and set more and larger fruit! So, while the trees don't like wet feet, they like adequate water to live and grow well and set a crop.
Also, although most peaches are self fruitful, meaning they can pollinate themselves, there may be some which need another peach or at least a nectarine to cross pollinate with.
The suggestions of compost over the ground out to the drip line or a bit further out an inch or two deep. Compost, not manure.
Janice
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