Overhead or underhand

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fPersephone wrote:

    Indeed; why did I think this to be a NG about gardening?
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I'm not looking for a debate with the illuminati. I just wanted some gardening advice regarding boards. You know ........ wood ......... lumber ..........
No? ................
sigh ......................
Steve
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Wood I lumber? I lumber about everywhere I go. I kinda got this shuffle down (An a one, an a two, an a one-two-three an a one an a two, and usw.) Hunert degrees today, hunert an 2 yesterday. Think I'm gonna chop a section out of my plastic mulch where a half dozen string beans can't make no headway. Tired of seeing their fricasseed little bodies. Got 10 leeks in today (gotta get out early before the inferno hits). About forty to go, when they get bigger.
The heat is encouraging. Last year was a terrible year and we only had three 100F days. This year we have already had four. Two years ago was a banner year in the garden with a dozen days of 100F days. Everything seems to be flowering precociously and the bees were here waiting for them
Nearly all my plots with deep mulch have been pillaged by a raccoon. The motion sensitive sprinkler and a little proprietor's piss seems to deter him/her but I'm defending too much land and I'm getting down to cotton balls.
My trial spot for cabbage and cauliflower doesn't seem to be working out. They are starting to bolt. I think I'll start rotating in some cabbage to the lettuce patch and some lettuce into the cabbage patch and see how that works out.
Tomorrow I'll get the the tromboncini in.
I'm kind of excited because I have two teeny tiny stevia plants. Now all I have to do is nurture. Identified one of my mystery plants from last year as valeriana officianalis, and there are two species of skull cap, a returning elcampane, a volunteer milk thistle, and much more from this year.
I'm back in the prunella business, the flower spikes are out again. Mixed with mint and sliced lemon, it make a very nice drink for a hot day.
Spδter.
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
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Sounds good

Overhead spraying uses up more water than ground level watering due to evaporative loss. With frequent use it can also encourage fungi by leaving the leaves wet, raising humidity and bringing up spores from the ground if it squirts that far.
However some types of plants will do much better with raised humidity and the coolness produced by the evaporative loss - provided you can afford the water and other possible consequences.
I know of a rainforest maintained in a gully by spraying at intervals round the clock in a climate that gets about 25 in per year of rain and would never support such a thing naturally.
You have to decide on how much you want to grow according to your climate and how much you want to create a microclimate.
Should I have the water

Drippers or "leaky" hoses will do this and conserve water too.
I would like it all to come

Cannot comment due to lack of experience with gardens freezing.

David
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Sorry, I should have added that water is terribly expensive here. We are AG 1 zoning, and the water bill is a flat $100 a year with no meter for a 1 1/4" line.
Steve ;-)
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    I grow veggies in raised community beds and in containers in western peninsular Florida, USDA zone 9, poor sandy native soil. I have come to prefer containers and have begun gradually migrating amended garden soil from the beds as containers become available. Your experience may differ but, in this sandy Florida "blackjack" soil, I have found raised beds to be far more conservative of resources than in-ground gardening. In the beds I practice sort of hybrid "wide row" and "square foot" gardening: Crowd the plants slightly but enough to keep the understorey well-shaded and provide cages, fences, trellises, etc. for those that have even the least propensity to climb. Provide watering stations for wasps and other predatory insects AWA perches for dragonflies. Under taller plants -- okra and eggplant, for example -- I always underplant a "living mulch". Most often I use peanuts because they thrive in the Southeastern U.S.A. and their nitrogen-fixation, doesn't kick in until fairly late in the game, after most plants' sensitivity to excess N has passed.

    For many years, I did pretty well using simple flooding but have realised many advantages from using those weeping soaker hoses that are manufactured from reclaimed tires. From the brand that is available to me, using the specific length that I do, I receive a nominal .75gpm flow at nominal 25psi. In each 24 sq' bed, I use two 25' hoses connected to a garden hose via a simple manifold and regulated with an off-the-shelf drip system regulator ($11 at Lowe's). Works well: No runoff; no significant evaporative loss. The regulator allows the use of elapsed time to measure total water delivered, instead of counting pump cylcles -- not a particularly accurate method. Soaker or drip irrigation, wide-row planting, underplantings and mulch combine to minimize evaporative losses, important in this climate.
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--

Ah, a perceptive man, ol' Teddy. Funny how things ain't changed much.

- Billy
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Billy wrote:

Vote Bullmoose
cheers
oz, getting feet rubbed after three days (and nights) of square dancing
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