OT English System vs Imperial System of Measure

Page 2 of 2  
Nad R wrote:

Military was already metric when I enlisted in 1978. There was legacy stuff in place but anything new was metric. By now the amount of legacy stuff will be pretty small.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nad R;927420 Wrote:

I was in Guatemala once. Small size drink bottles were 12 oz, larger ones were 1 litre. Mixes of measures are not uncommon.
Here in Britain: Petrol is sold in litres but roads are measured in miles. Unfortunately fuel consumption is only available in mpg or litres/100km, when it would make much more sense if it was reported as miles/litre or litres/100 miles. Some oldies have to convert litres to gallons in their head, to understand what they are buying, but I haven't discussed gallons with anyone for many years, except hidden in mpg fuel consumption measures.
The weather forecast is given in celcius as the prime measure, (with Frankenstein in parenthesis on occasion). Although a few over 50s still think in Frankenstein, celcius (often given its old name centigrade) is what is in common use.
Beer and milk are sold in pints, but all other liquids are sold in litres. So there is still an understanding of pints for consumable liquids.
Recipe books and scales still use pounds/oz with metric alternative. So although food is sold in kg in shops, pounds/oz remain deeply engrained. Personally I mainly use metric, though certain recipes I've been using for decades I still think in oz. US recipes in cups confuse us terribly. I have stuck a label on my scales 1 cup = 225g, for translation from US recipe books.
Even though in theory metric, a lot of packaged things are sold in amounts of "about a pound", sometimes precisely 454g, but often 400g, 450g, 500g. Although certain things have legally prescribed package sizes: wine can be sold as 375ml, 500ml, 750ml, 1000ml, and no other sizes in this range. So the old practice of selling you 720ml, 700ml, even 690ml I saw once, is outlawed.
Everything in DIY shops is metric. Working off plans, builders use mm. But people know their height in feet and inches and it is a rare person who readily knows it in mm, although that is how the doctor will record it on your medical records. People still give approximations in inches, even young people, though they never do any sums at school in such amounts.
So, apart from miles for roads (in fact it is illegal to measure roads in km, a council who put up some metric signs had to take them down) and pints for beer and milk, just about everything else is legally required to be metric in Britain. After 30-40 years, we are are increasingly getting used to them. But inches/feet and pounds/oz remain engrained in the culture, even for young people, even though they learn nothing about them at school.
--
echinosum

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So I see said the blind man. Here in the US I have noticed most modern books on baking no longer measure dry goods by volume. Many of the newer books on baking measure dry goods by weight because items like flour can very from different sources. When they go by weight the baked goods tend to more consistent.
But remember the first line. A gallon is not same as a gallon in Canada. A pint in the US is sixteen ounces, some countries a pint is twenty ounces ( I think ).
So math may not be a common language after all :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R Garden in zone 5a All postings uses the American
System of Measures.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nad R wrote:

It's worse than the difference in ounces per pint (or gallon). The US fluid ounce is not the same as the Imperial fluid ounce either.
The interesting thing is you can agree over what is in a bottle of scotch. A US fifth (one fifth of a US gal) is the same as one sixth of an Imperial gallon which was the traditional size for wine and spirit bottles. So all those bottles of Laphroaig were despatched for US consumption only needed new labels. With metric conversion those scotch bottles were rounded to 750ml and now somehow to 700ml. The universe is clearly shrinking.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We're Doomed :) And I thought the universe was expanding according to the latest news on astrophysics.
Time to get a bottle of scotch :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R
Garden in zone 5a
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Indeed. USians call it 'math' whereas Australians call it 'maths' (always with an 's' on the end and I presume that might be because it [perhaps] liguistically, derives from 'mathmatics' as opposed to 'arithmetic'). Must check my big OED some day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My understanding is that the four basic functions of math are called arithmetic. When you describe a situation, it is math.
--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Delete any possible international inclusiveness by the use of that 'you' Billy.
I've just looked up my OED (the 20 volume version) and it says that 'math is used as an abbreviation in written English in the UK but not in speech, the normal form being 'maths'. For 'maths' it says that it is an abreviation of 'mathematics'. It's the same in Australian English.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Describing a situation, is math?

--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I wouldn't have thought so, but I assume you must have had a reason for saying it was.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What do you usually measure on your scale, that a cup would equal half a kilo (vol/mass).
--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw that also, however a cup is a liquid measure and thought it may be different than ours. Also 225g is less than one fourth a kilogram, not one half.
Dry measure of flour can be different from product to product. For baking measuring flour is best done by weight rather than by volume.
My other thought was they have A cup that weighs 225g :)
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R Garden in zone 5a All postings uses the American
System of Measures.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And the brain farts just keep on coming ;O) Don't read what I write, read what I mean, and I meant a pound, not a kilo (but then it's not mass is it? :O( Rats! It would be volume divided by force [I see that a pound is now also considered mass, but back in the day, mass was measured by slugs, which brings us back to the garden.];O)

--
- Billy

Mad dog Republicans to the right. Democratic spider webs to the left. True
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Well I would have thought that you'd already know about Imperial measures. I was very surprised to find that you didn't.

Yep, but I certainly will never use such a term. It's what I've always called US measurements as they relate to Pints and Gallons. Other measures used by USians are Imperial but for some unknown reason they are not called that in the US.

I always have been conscious of those differences and use my knowledge of those differences on a regualar basis.
I am a keen cook so since sometime in the 1970s, I have always needed to know if I'm dealing with an old Imperial recipe or a US recipe (although I rarely cook any modern US recipes).
In addition, the only manufacturers of measuring jugs with ounce measures notated on them these days are US manufacturers. Wwhenever I use one of my big measuring jugs that tries to tell me that a Pint only contains 16 ounces, I tell it that it's being parochial and I might possibly want to use the 20 ounce Pint. It never manages to see the error of it's way though and insists that 16 ounce Pint is the only option.

It's not a 'mix up' as I explained in an earlier post. It's two different systems used in parallell by older people who grew up under an earlier system and who had to learn to use a new system, but who have not yet died out leaving the only a younger generation who knows only the new system.
Here in the US the two systems are separate, no mix. It is one or

That should be Imperial Gallon. The UK is only one place on the globe that uses that form of meaure.

When I see a US site that refers to 5 gallon buckets, I know exactly what size they are referring to - its a 20 litre bucket although you'd never want to put a full 20 litres of liquid into it. More common here for household use in the 9 litre bucket which would hold 10 litre is filled right to the brim but it would be ineffective to do so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.