Non Gumbo

I grew okra for the first time this year and I am pleasantly surprised at how attractive and prolific the plant is. I now find myself with a surplus and none of the neighbours have any idea what to do with it so just giving it away is a waste. I don't have much experience with it, what can I make aside from gumbo?
I know I can google for 10000 recipes but often these are just copied around indefinitely with no indication their value. I am hoping for recommendations from those who actually cook and enjoy okra not those who reproduce recipes :-)
Supplementary question. If you fail to cut them when young, this can be a matter of one or two days more on the bush, the larger pods get rather fibrous and full of seeds. Is there any common use for these (other than compost) that avoids the rough texture?
David
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snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au wrote:

My favorite way is roasted. Toss with a little olive oil and salt, roast at 400F until it's good and browned. Yumma!

I only buy them at the store, so I can't help you there.
Serene
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On Mar 25, 8:09 am, " snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au"

Hi David
I also like okra but seldom cook it because my family doesn't like it.
You don't necessarily have to make a full blown gumbo with okra, you can cook it the way they cook it in Greece and in Cyprus. It's like a stew. What you do is: after cleaning the okra you fry it in a little olive oil, together with sliced onions and garlic. After a few minutes you throw in a can of peeled tomatoes (or 2, depending on the quantity you are making) together with the liquid. Let the okra simmer till cooked and saucy. Season with sea salt and pepper and a pinch of dried oregano.
Yummm! Victoria http://www.squidoo.com/tastefulcooking
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On Mar 25, 1:09�am, " snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au"

Make spicey pickles with them, they're especially good with bloody marys.
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snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au wrote: . Is there any common use for these

andy writes: If a pod gets too tough to bother with picking, I leave it on the plant. At end of life when the plant dries up, the seeds in the pod can be used for next year's garden....
I've recently been surfing for some new okra recipes that don't involve frying or mixing with much other stuff.... Apparently one can microwave the pods for a couple minutes, just like with carrots or onions. I'll try it when my new crop comes in....If it works, it'll be a nice, quick snack...
Also, as one of the other posters here mentioned, baking them. I'll try that also....
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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With apologies to Alan Zelt for modifying his excellent lutefisk recipe, this (IMO) is the only way to prepare okra:
* Exported from MasterCook *
Okra Preparation
Recipe modified By : Me Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :1:00 Categories : Barbeque, Southern, Traditional
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 bushel Okra 5 sticks firewood 1 quart gasoline 1 750ml Gentleman Jack -- poured over ice, optional
Pour a glass of Gentleman Jack, (ice or not is optional). Take a healthy drink, because this preparation is man's work.
Dig a hole in your backyard. About 3ft deep should be sufficient.
To this hole, add the Okra and then the five fireplace logs.
Douse wood with the gasoline. Step back, and ignite the wood. Ensure that the fire is on high.
Sit back, away from the fire, on a comfortable chair. Take another drink.
In about 15 minutes, the fire should have died down. Stir the embers, until there is a consistency throughout of fine soot.
So that you remember this happy occasion, pour a shot of vodka into the embers, uttter "thank God," and go inside and have a great dinner.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Suggested Wine: Finlandia Serving Ideas : Before eating a good meal.
NOTES : After you have bought a okra, you will need a good method of preparation. While this preparation method is a bit unconventional, it will satisfy all unnatural cravings for okra.
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snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au wrote:

know others pickle them. This is the best fried okra I've ever made.
* Exported from MasterCook *
Fried Okra
Recipe By :Southern Living, May 1987 Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Vegetables
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 pound okra -- 1/ 2 inch slices 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 egg whites 1 1/2 cups bread crumbs vegetable oil for frying salt
This comes from the Southern Living magazine cookbook, May 1987
Wash okra, drain well. Remove stems and tips. Cut into 1/2 inch slices. Coat with flour (I just tossed all together in bowl) Beat egg whites (at room temp) until stiff peaks form. Fold into okra. Stir in bread crumbs, coating okra well. Deep fry okra in hot oil (375 degrees) until golden brown. drain on paper towels and sprinkle with salt.
* Exported from MasterCook *
Smothered Okra and Tomatoes
Recipe By :Gourmet Magazine Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :0:20 Categories : Vegetables
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 pounds okra 3 cups chopped onions 2 cups chopped celery 3 cups chopped, peeled and seeded tomatoes, -- or 3 cups canned 5 bay leaves 1/3 cup vegetable oil 1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 teaspoon thyme 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
Preheat oven to 300 degrees Wash the okra under cool water. Cut off stems and slice each pod crosswise into 1/2 inch rounds Combine the okra and the rest of the indgredients in a large heavy oven proof pot, not cast iron. Mix well. Bake covered, stirring occasionally for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until the slime has disappeared. Bake uncovered for the last 15 min. of cooking time. The time may vary depending on the tenderness of the okra. Remove bay leaves and serve or let cool completely and store in freezer containers.
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David wrote:

Having spent most of my adult life in Oklahoma (transplanted from California, but soon to be there again) I have had a lot of experience with growing okra (and eating it!)
My preferred styles of okra are fried and pickled. Must concur with whoever said that spicy pickled okra are great in Bloody Marys .... Much better (to me) than celery or even pickled green beans.

You have to cut them early. We never found a good way of eating them when they got all large and tough like that. If there was more coming on than we could consume, mom would go ahead and prep them for frying (cornmeal breading) and then would just put the lot in a zip lock back and freeze it, so we had orka all through the year.
I am really looking forward to vegetable gardening again -- but not sure if we will have enough room for a large bed of okra. It does take up space.
Christine will be in town tomorrow night and the place I plan on taking her for barbecue does a good job with okra.
--Lin
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wrote:
<snip>

I'm envious! You girls have a great time :-)
TammyM, never had REAL 'Q
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On 24 Mar 2007 22:09:08 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au"

These are recipes I make regularly in the summertime. I don't have a garden, but okra is plentiful and cheap at our local farmer's market.
My father taught me to mash the okra pod between my thumb and forefinger and if the pod cracks or splits then it's compost. If it doesn't, then I use it.
The first, okra patties, is our favorite and I make it on on a griddle on my grill. I make the second, grilled okra, when I'm not in the mood to bother with okra patties. Pickled okra is good with sandwiches and salads.
Okra Patties
1 pound Okra, tops removed. 1/2 cup finely diced onion 1 tsp salt pepper to taste 1 tsp baking powder 1 egg, slightly beaten 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup cornmeal 1/2 tsp garlic powder or chopped garlic to taste, optional Cooking oil of choice (I use light olive oil)
Process okra in a food processor until finely chopped. You want the largest pieces to be about the size of a pea. remove to a large bowl. Combine wet ingredients and add to okra. Combine dry ingredients and add to Okra. If you have done it right, you will have a big wad of glop.
Preheat a griddle. Add oil. It helps to have a bowl of oil reserved on the side. Using a 1/4 cup measure, dig 1/4 cup of the mixture out of the wad of glop and place on the griddle. Working quickly, take your spatula and dip it into the reserved oil so it doesn't stick to the okra, and flatten the patty to about 1/4 inch thickness. This step is very important. If you don't get the patty thin enough it will be raw in the middle. As you flatten it it will spread. I can get about 4 patties on my griddle at one time.
Repeat with as many patties as you want. As you turn each patty, add a little more oil to the griddle. This is important to help cook the middle of the patties.
Cook until Okra is brown on both sides. Note that here in the southern United States okra is not done until some of it is black, and that's the way I cook it. If it's not TOO black, it doesn't taste burned, but rather has a nice smokey taste.
This recipe makes about eight patties. When I make it, I make half one night and the rest the next night. It keeps nicely overnight in the refrigerator, but no longer than that.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grilled (or broiled) Okra Preparation Time: 10 minutes Cooking Time: 10 minutes
Eighteen 12-inch wooden skewers, soaked in water for at least 30 minutes
1 pound small-medium okra pods 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Coarse sea salt 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Preheat grill or broiler. Wash the okra under cold running water and dry with paper towels. In a large bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, the cayenne, and black pepper and mix well. Add the okra to the marinade and toss to coat. Thread 5 to 7 okra pods onto 2 skewers each (to keep okra in place).
If grilling, place the skewers on the grill and cook until browned and slightly crisp, 3 to 4 minutes per side, turning with tongs frequently.
If broiling, place the skewers about 3 inches from the heat and broil until browned and slightly crisp, 3 to 4 minutes per side, turning with tongs frequently.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Quick Pickled Okra
1 lb okra 6 tablespoons kosher salt 2 c water 3 c distilled vinegar 2 tablespoon sugar 2 bay leaves 1/4-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspooon brown mustard seeds 2 c sliced onions
Soak okra briefly in cold water. Drain. Toss in 3 T salt. Drain 1 hour.
Combine water, vinegar, remaining salt, sugar & spices in a nonreactive saucepan over medium heat. Stir to boil. Add onions. Cook 1 minute.
Rinse okra in cool water. Place in large plastic container. Cover with brine mixture and stir.
Cover & refrigerate at least 6 hours. Best used after 3 days in fridge. Will keep about a month, but they don't last that long in my house.
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wrote:

--------------
Thanks for the interesting recipes. I can think of a couple spices to add to the patties, separately of course - a Greek lemon blend, hot chile or chipotle blend, and of course a curry. I love making okra pickles and my family eats them up like candy, stem end and all. I use a 6:1 cider vinegar to water and my homemade pickling spice. Or instead of the spice, use a coupla garlic cloves or a halved shallot. With or without salt in the recipe they are very good. I also add just a touch of local honey - about a teaspoonful or two per jar. Don't want it sweet necessarily, but it adds a certain perfume that I like. And a hot chile pepper to some jars. Cooked okra is soothing to the stomach. I learned to pick and use okra that was as tender as the end of my plump nose. Edrena
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On 24 Mar 2007 22:09:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aussiemail.com.au wrote:

Grill 'em. Salt and pepper and some molasses or honey. You won't believe how good they are grilled.
Here is a picture of them prior to grilling.
http://s36.photobucket.com/albums/e17/billyjeanking/?action=view&current=okra.jpg
jay
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Hi Gumbo challenged friend. I grow lots of okra. I guess being from Louisiana I have ate my share of okra. I can many,many jars of this each year. Fry, bake, or many other ways. Now try this: Equal parts of Okra and whole tomatoes. First cook some garlic, you decide how much you like. Then add a bit of onion, saute till tender, now add the okra, and the tomatoes. Cook slowly for about a hour on low heat. I also put corn in it sometimes, or bannana peppers. This served over white rice is wonderful
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Oh gods... Mom used to combine sliced okra, tomatoes and onions too as a side dish.
It's wonderful!
--
Peace, Om

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When they're still small, we eat them raw. From almost birth, I ate raw veggies out in the garden .... still do. Peas, asparagus, tomatoes, beans ... not root vegetables, of course. My mother used to boil asparagus to death and I thought I hated it until I had it tender-crisp and then tried it raw. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Delete the obvious to reply to me personally. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Wow...y'all have certainly presented some really great-sounding ideas. I'm not a big okra fan, but I love gumbo; I also like the occasional fried okra. I'll have to try some of these other ideas & see how they pan out.
Thanks!
~Eri in TX
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Our two favorite ways to cook okra:
1. marinade them, put in a grill basket and grill (or combine with other vegetables)
2. Mexican okra casserole
Mexican Okra Casserole ================= Take a medium size casserole dish, spray with oil. Layer in this order: tender okra, chopped onion, chopped bell pepper, small can of Mexican tomatoes with green chilies, cheddar cheese, layer of okra, layer of onion, layer of green pepper, can of stewed tomatoes, Monterey jack grated cheese and pepper.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees(F). Bake for 45 to 60 minutes, or until the pepper and onion are tender.
I often cut out the repeated layer.
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schmuttis wrote on 4 Apr 2007 11:43:39 -0700:
s> 1. marinade them, put in a grill basket and grill (or s> combine with other vegetables)
s> 2. Mexican okra casserole
I hope I have not bored people with this before but okra makes a good Indian Raita. Cut the okra into 1/8 inch slices and fry until brown and crisp. Mix yoghurt and sour cream 1:1 with a sliced jalapeno and salt and then fold in the crisp okra.
James Silverton Potomac, Maryland
E-mail, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.comcast.not
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