Next year

The green beans get their own trellis or other support . I let them go over onto the tomato cages because they were making the corn that was supposed to support them fall over . This has adversely impacted the sunlight to the tomatoes , and yields have suffered . Several other things I'll do different next year ... like not grow corn . Mine sucks , and the yield/area isn't that great . Lettuces and spinach will be in the ground before the snow <if any> melts , I'm tired of it bolting as soon as it starts to produce .<<< I pick lettuce , spinach , red beet , bok choy as soon as the leaves are big enough to make a salad . Too bad it all bolts before the tomatoes are ripe .>>> Potatoes are still on trial , we'll need to see what the yield is . Right now , the list for next year is topped by strawberries <worked hard to get them established !> green beans <Kentucky Wonder , I'm letting some seed> tomatoes <variety not decided > green onions <we love 'em> and a few varieties of squash , including summer , zukes , acorn , and pumpkins .
--
Snag
Blue Agave Rocks
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/5/2014 12:06 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

bought nylon (long-life) trellis netting from Amazon. Works great for cukes, climbing beans, etc. Even used the conduit fixtures to tie the pieces together. Made them five feet tall by four feet wide, drove 1/2 inch rebar into the ground and set the conduit right down over the rebar. I let them go

For a few years we did the old Indian thing, plant corn, climbing beans and squash around the base. Corn grows tall, beans climb, squash shades the ground. Even put a fish or two into each bed. Worked well enough to get some corn, beans, and squash and taught my kids how my ancestors gardened. Finally gave it up as there are more modern methods nowadays that produce more produce.
Lettuces and spinach

8b a few years ago. Lettuce here grows for months before bolting in the heat of summer. We planted chard last fall and are still harvesting some on a weekly basis. Our chard is sheltered from the sun from noon on to darkness and that is probably why it is doing so well. Now that it is August the chard is slowing down a good bit.
A friend gave me starts of "bunching" onions twenty odd years ago, still got them growing, even after a move. When we harvest a bunch we leave the roots on one onion and trim the top back to just above the white part and replant that one. A few weeks later we have another bunch growing. Grew leeks last winter, they got huge, found out we don't care for the taste. Planted Texas 1015Y sweet onion seed, got golf ball sized onions. Won't do that again, they're cheaper at the supermarket here.
That's what gardening is all about, trial plantings sometimes make sense, sometimes they don't. Keep on trying, it's still a lot of fun and sometimes you're amazed at what you get.
George
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, August 5, 2014 1:06:28 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

Try several varieties of tomatoes, this year I have several slicers, two pa ste and a couple of cherry tomatoes. I try to get at least one modern disea se resistant tomato in the slicers. The paste tomatoes generally fruit at o nce so there are a lot for canning at one time (I can the slicers too when there is an abundance). You might also look at a variety called "Longkeeper ". If I start these mid-summer I'll have tomatoes until Christmas at least.
Corn and potatoes take up a lot of space and are relatively cheap. I usuall y buy them at the farmer's market.
Try your cool weather crops in the fall. Many of them are far sweeter after a little nip of frost and are not killed until a hard freeze. Lots of year s the spinach will over winter and provide early pickings in March.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote:

there are smaller versions of beans which don't climb so much (or not at all).

without an electric fence growing corn here is often a waste of space. we don't eat a lot of it at the moment and nobody here uses cornmeal a lot either, so it isn't a high priority crop in comparison to tomatoes or beans.

each year can be so different from the last that it is really tough to plan for the seasons exactly. this sort of variation is why i plant multiple crops, multiple varieties and in different types of soils as i can find the space for them. each year i learn more, something new, and figure out how to work a little smarter (even if i'm not quite coordinated :) ).
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
songbird wrote:

There is a learning curve ... I'm groping kinda in the dark , this area is so different from everywhere else I've ever lived . This year was better than last , and I'm figgerin' out what's good use of the space I have for maximum reduction in cash outlay for food . Pole beans are an efficient use of space , they go up and not out . Lettuce needs to be planted where it'll be shaded most of the day , that's going to be difficult <apparently too much sun is why mine bolts so early> . Hmmm , plant it on the east side of the pole beans ... and near the top edge nearest the woods , that'll limit the direct sun . Zucchini , squashes , and cukes take space , but we like 'em and think it worth it - and they'll go in a different part of the garden , this year I had/have problems with fungus . Tomatoes and beans won't be near each other again , I learned that lesson this year with the beans shading the tomatoes . Corn will not be on the list next year , mine sucks and we don't eat that much - jury's still out on potatoes , but I suspect we may not grow them next year unless I get a really good yield this year . Garlic and onions will definitely be on the list , garlic is going in this fall . Tomatoes will be separated a little more , the cages need a bit more room so I can get between them . I'll be focused on max yields again , since we now have room to store canned stuff - and all the equipment to do so .
--
Snag
And the strawberry patch will be allowed to double in size ... my original
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, August 6, 2014 10:21:28 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

Lettuce should be about finished by the time pole beans are planted.
I'm with you on the squashes. This year I have nine different kinds including two winter squashes. Squash is bad to get powdery mildew and die before it's time. I usually plant a couple of hills every two weeks until the middle of July or so.
I grow sweet potatoes instead of regular ones. Regular potatoes are usually cheap, so I buy what we need. Sweet potatoes have a lot more nutrient value(plus they're better for my diabetic diet).
I'm envious of the strawberries, they don't do well for me. I'll have to settle for blueberries. I've got about 700 plants or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Peek wrote:

I'd swap some of my strawberries for some of your blues ... we have wild huckleberries out in the woods , but the critters get 'em before I have a chance . I mean , I'm nice enough to leave blackberries for them , you'd think the least they could do is leave me some blueberries !
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.