New to vegetable gardening

Hi All--
I think 2007 is going to be the year i finally try a vegetable garden---I'm a bit of a fanatic about hydrangeas and roses, and both have done well without too much intervention from me.
My first question is this--I have a spot picked out for a veggie garden, lots of sun, good drainage, etc...My intention is that while it is still warm here in NJ (unbeilable, will still be in the 50's this week!), I would like to turn the soil over. No problem with that, right? Now, I have two pet bunnies....and I know i can use their manure without a problem, no need to wait. Here is the question--they are bedded with pine shavings (the kind you use for horses), and the manure is mixed in. Any problem with adding this to the existing soil????
thanks for your help--
betsey
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betsey wrote:

As for bunny crap, I wouldn't use it. I don't really know why, I just wouldn't. I do use composted cow manure though.
The pine chips will probably add acidity to the soil which can also be a problem.
I'd get composted cow manure and 'till that in, then check the PH in the spring and adjust as necessary. If you don't have the means to do a soil test, take a sample to your local Cooperative Extension office and they'll do it for a nominal fee and tell you what's needed.
--
Steve

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betsey wrote:

the bedding of my daughter's guinea pigs makes excellent compost. It is pine shavings, bits of uneaten food and their manure. It appears to have the proper ratio of green/brown because it composts quickly. don't worry about acidity, it isn't. In fact, I tend to use it with greens, which are fussy about compost quality.
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I've used bunny poo mixed with a corn cob bedding for years and it works great! The pine shavings might not break down as easily,though, so you might want to start a compost pile and pile the soiled bedding there to let it work for 6 months or a year.
I've put mine straight in the garden and let it compost, and it worked well both ways. If you put the bunny poops straight in the garden, though, they will float like little coco puffs in heavy rains.
Penelope
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No problem at all. Rabbit poo is excellent. And the manure will help to break down the shavings and add humus to the soil. However, if I was in your situation, I'd put it on top of the soil in a thickish layer and leave it that way till spring arrives in your hemisphere and then I'd dig it in.
The way I'd go from then onis to always have a bit of ground in the preparation stage and put the new fresh bunny poo on that and leave it to age for a while. I assume you also use it round the roses?? It'd be good for them too.
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Farm1 wrote:

Thanks for the information everyone. Our soil here tends to have nice top soil, but a clay base. so, i know i need to amend.
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