My Compost Smells

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Hey folks, A few months ago a friend of mine who lives near me, pointed out a good solution to avoid spendig money on fertilizers, which is piling garden trash, but the thing is how long will it take for my pile to be ready for the soil? And anyway it smells!
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In article

It's not just your piles that stink.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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Tonyfrost wrote:

The time it takes depends on the mix of ingredients in it, the temperature, how often you turn it and if you have the moisture right. From 6 weeks to a year. If it has been snowing those microorganisms are not working much at all. They all smell somewhat but if it is a really revolting sour smell it means that it has gone anaerobic, that is not enough air and/or too wet.
David
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...if it smells like rotting eggs or sulphur then you can solve that immediate problem by turning it several times and mixing in some dry material like leaves or shredded paper. The smell should lessen.
rob
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Thanks Rob, I'll try to do that, but I was wondering if there was like a product that you can put on the stack to cover the smell... ______________________________________ It's called 'sweat'. Get a fork, turn the compost until you are lathered in sweat and then you'll have no further problems with smelly compost.
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wrote:

ROFL!
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You don't need to cover the smell with yet another. See the previous posts; a healthy compost heap has very little odor, and certainly not an unpleasant one.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Many folks are unaware of the fact of life that death and decay aka rot enable growth and rebirth. A sterile world is devoid of life.
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Bill who putters wrote:

Ommmmmmmmmmmmmmm
David
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In article <d48460cb-92b4-4144-a519-f20833629a63

Everyone's joking right now but let me inject a serious note.
THere are no useful shortcuts.
You want compost, you are going to have to learn about it and put the work in.
http://www.compost.org/backyard.html
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says...

I certainly wasn't joking when I told him he used to use sweat as an ingredient. Unless or until he learns to add that, he won't have compost - he'll simply have rotted vegetation. I see no problems with the rotted vegetation approach either, but if he wants to go that way, he will need to understand that he doesn't pile it, he spreads it and them has to a potential weed problem unless he also learns how to use the rotted vegetation.
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Then their is the issue of heat to help break down.
<http://compost.css.cornell.edu/physics.html
Bill
Tao Follows The Earth 2:36 David Darling The Tao Of Cello New Age 1 1/24/10 3:17 PM 1993 AAC audio file
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On Thu, 25 Feb 2010 09:26:23 +1100, "FarmI" wrote:

That's not strictly true. What the "sweat" (turning) adds is oxygen, but there are other ways of providing that, easiest of which is to alternate the layers of vege scraps with layers of straw that trap air in the pile. The Humanure Handbook actually recommends that over turning, as turning tends to break the mycelia of all the fungi in the pile.
I'm not saying that turning is bad (it's good!), just that it isn't the only answer.
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Ross McKay, Toronto, NSW Australia
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It IS strictly true as it applies to him. He has smelly 'compost' right now (or says he does). The only way to cure his current 'compost' problem is to turn it. Any future compost pile is not what he asked about.
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wrote:

Well, he could add leaves or straw on the top which would contain the smell.

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wrote:

Well he could add lime. But that would only open up a can of worms. Which kind? Oh this composting thing is so daffodil .
http://compost.css.cornell.edu/physics.html
Bill
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says...

Trying to seal it up would make the pile more anaerobic.
Eventually it all breaks down and the smell goes away but depending on the size of the bin/pile, it can take awhile.
I can't give accurate facts and figures but I've instigated a couple of compost heap meltdowns with too many grass clippings and I think it took about two weeks for the stench to drop to barely noticeable.
At the time the neighbours were all on vacation or the houses were vacant and up for sale, my wife was away and the compost bins are far away from the house so I let it go and then incorporated the result in the next compost heap.
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wrote:

Adding leaves (and rarely straw) is actually what I do when I empty my inside compost bucket on top of the pile. I'm a lazy composter who only turns it once a year. The leaves cover the odor as far as my nose can tell. Come spring I turn the whole thing over and take from the bottom.
I used to love to use grass clippings but now I just leave them where they fall.
Someday it's going to warm up.....
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says...

Which is adding brown to green.
Brown + green in relatively good proportion equals no stench to speak of.
We do that too through snowless periods during the winter which serves double duty by keeping the kitchen compost hidden until things heat up.
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wrote:

Yup.
I guess I do sort of turn it in the warmer months by covering the kitchen by products with the unfinished compost.
I'm looking forward to be able to do more than converse about gardening...
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