Mortgage Lifter

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I've been cooking with my extra cherry tomatoes (after giving several bags away to my team lead who has two young sons), but it hadn't dawned on me to make sauce and thus can them. Of course! How foolish of me.
One of my favorite ways to eat the extras is to cook a grass-fed beef patty in a heavy cast iron skillet, then, when the patty's cooked, take it out, turn up the heat in the skillet, and toss in freshly washed cherry tomatoes. Shake the pan as they sizzle and get a bit cooked, then pour/roll them onto the plate with the patty.
Also good with onion and mushroom put in first after a little EVOO, then add the cherry tomatoes last. Add a glop of guacamole or just slices of avocado to the plate with the patty and veggies, and you have a lovely rather low-carb supper that took about 15 minutes to prepare. My favorite kind.
Priscilla
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wrote:

Cherry tomatoes make the very best juice. Have a bloody Mary made with cherry tomato juice, absolutely the best!
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Steve Peek wrote: ...

not sweet 100s, i did some juice from them last summer as a test and it was sweet but relatively tasteless otherwise.
we've added some to the tomato juice this year as we've had so many and it is a nice bit of added sweetness to the complexity of the beefsteaks.
songbird
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Boron Elgar wrote:

hm, we had that problem last year, but not this year as much. the watering lately has been more even and we are picking more often (when they are orange they taste as good to me as a regular tomato) orange or red.
i'm splitting more by accidentally stepping on them. the plants get rather large and sprawl all over the place. still loaded with fruit.

past years we had more variety in sizes of tomatoes so we had small ones i wouldn't mind giving some away. this year they are not perfect in shape (they are often having strange holes in the ends, i suspect that being from how hot it was when the fruit first set), but they are mostly huge. we'll be picking again tomorrow.
...

oh, well, yeah, we have fences and defenses in layers. without the 7ft fence for keeping the deer out the rest of the gardening in there would be pointless. one neighbor has lost her complete pepper and tomato crop this year to the deer.
in addition to the fence i put out snap traps to reduce the chipmunk/mice/vole populations and we have large rocks in piles to encourage the snakes.
everbearing have more than one chance at getting some kind of crop even if it is a smaller one than the initial burst. i'm just finishing the third round of flowering/ fruiting and might get another in before the temperatures get too cold.
songbird
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Heh! I can relate. I get a few berries while I'm doing my garden work, but not enough for a dish.... yet. The plants are expanding, and I hope to add the adjacent bed into the strawberry fields next year.
I got hoops and netting to put over them, but Irene came along just then, and I put off installing them.
Priscilla
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Priscilla H. Ballou wrote:

i hope that helps. :)
i've really enjoyed my patch this season and now that i've started some everbearing plants i've eaten a few here or there all season. one plant just bloomed again so i might sneak one more berry in before the weather turns inhospitable.
my one patch is now expanding to three patches, so i can have more to put up. i eat too many and we give away enough to not have left me much this year to make jam with. so next year i hope to do a little better. and perhaps i'll try not to eat quite so many.
i still have to finish thinning the first patch out. one edge to go and that should give me more plants to continue the takeover of one of the bean patches. it will be a good use of the space for a few seasons.
songbird *oink*
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Mortgage Lifter was bred to be pretty and not bruise easily anything else was of no consequence. I grew some Rutgers this year because of a childhood memory. They were comparable to your experience with the ML. If your heirloom was really good save the seeds. I have several that I save each year. Their flavor is far superior to "modern" tomatoes, unfortunately their disease resistance is not.

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On Wed, 24 Aug 2011 13:28:35 -0400, Boron Elgar

For the last several years I have been trying lots of different tomatoes and I have decided that next year I am only going to plant Viva Italia, Better Boy, Early Girl and Jelly Bean. I am also going to plant a second crop of Viva Italia and Better Boy since I seem to have so much trouble with various and sundry blights and bugs.
A couple of days ago I found out what was eating my cantaloupe -- a turtle.
--
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wrote:

I cannot say that I have any consistency from year to year. The weather seems to have such a great affect of what thrives and doesn't - at least with the veggies, that I find some of it a crap shoot.
Oh, that doesn't stop me, of course, nothing will, but I would love to find a tomato that gives me what I want year after year. I have a chance at it with the volunteers that start growing in mid August in a shady patch of impatiens each year. I just let'em do their thing - which must be good as I have 7 plants growing there right now. I should try to save some seed from them and put them in the sun next year as they are like the Molly Brown of tomatoes (cherries).

Oh, now THAT is a great garden story.
Boron
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The Cook wrote: ...

a second crop in a different location or?

haha! the race goes to the turtle. did you catch it in the act?
songbird
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wrote:

That is my plant for next year. I have also picked out the spot for next year's tomatoes -- where the corn is growing this year. It hasn't had tomatoes in it. In fact, this year's plot was fleshly plowed for this year. Only grass on it for years.

Yes. He had his head in what was left of the cantaloupe.

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Did you reduce watering when the fruit started to set? Over watering can reduce flavor.
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- Billy
Both the House and Senate budget plan would have cut Social Security and
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wrote:

I have been growing tomatoes for over a quarter of a century and have the methodology down pat. On the contrary...these fruits were underweight for their size. Were this reduction in flavor true to form, of course, I'd notice a comparable reduction in all varieties that I grew.
I surely cannot control the weather, but I've other tomatoes in the same bed as the ML and they are fine. Last year all the tomatoes in that bed were sweeter, but alas, they were all volunteers from the compost. They were my clue indicating that particular flower bed should be converted to a tomato patch.
Boron
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I planted Burpee Early (Dont think they are Early girls) anyway, they finally ripened and they are very good. A nice tomato punch to the taste. I'm still waiting for the Better Boys to Ripen, some of those suffered blossom end rot.
The cherry 100's are plenty as usual.
Cheers
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I don't believe heirloom tomatoes are supposed to satisfy that criteria, you can saved the seeds for next year, that is about it.
There seems to be some misconception that modern hybrids were bred solely for looks and shelf life, this is of course true for some hybrids, used by commercial growers. But the other side of the coin is that another group of hybrids have been bred solely for taste for the home gardener, that are far superior in taste to any heirlooms. The hybrids took over pretty quickly when introduced was no accident, they are better in every way, but you have to pay for the seeds every year.
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Names please, I know of none that are superior in flavor to my heirlooms.

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May be, but when taste tests are done, "Brandywine" almost always wins. At the risk of starting another battle, "heirloom" implies "open pollinated," but the reverse depends on your definition of "heirloom."
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Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic
Zone 5/4 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 12:04:10 -0700 (PDT), fsadfa

I do not think you understood at all what I posted.
I don't care what variety the tomato I grew was - whether heirloom or hybrid - I just want it identified.
I have not praised hybrids or heirlooms over each other, and place my interest in flavor above all. It does me no good if a tomato withstands all blights and predation only to produce cardboard fruit. Similarly, I get no benefit from a potentially delicious fruit that never gets to ripen on the vine.
Although I am an inveterate seed saver and known to toss any sort of kitchen seed or pit into the dirt in an attempt to coax germination, I am also savvy enough to buy cheap seeds when the opportunity presents itself. Really, it isn't that large a part of my gardening budget that it concerns me in the least.
I have a date palm growing...the pit came from a piece of fruit was on a breakfast plate at a hotel in Las Vegas last spring. That's my kind of fun.
Boron
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How nice for you.
I presume that your unidentified "heirloom" tomato is still in production, it being only the 25th of Aug., and still full summer here in the northern hemisphere. I realize that a person of your experience doesn't require assistance, so just let me answer this question for others who may encounter this problem, but who don't have your wealth of knowledge. I have suggestions as to what you can do with your tomatoes. The most productive one would be to take a tomato and a leaf to a local nursery to try and match it, or as Susan "The Cook" would suggest, your local ag. extension office. <http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/index.html
No anecdotes required.
OK, at ease. If you got 'em, plant 'em.
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- Billy
Both the House and Senate budget plan would have cut Social Security and
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wrote:

Likewise, I am sure.

The heirloom is spent and has been for almost 2 weeks. Late blight got to it early, actually, and it spread from that to other plants near by, taking out several others, but I have another patch of different varieties far from it.
Northern NJ here. Great summer for tomatoes.. Never had so many tomatoes so early in the season. Most grown from seed sewn directly in the soil. I have great luck with that. The "heirloom" and Mortgage Lifter were purchased as plants, though.
Go on with your exposition, I am sure someone is listening.
Boron
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