Melon suggestions for New England

I'd like to be able to grow a melon. I do fine with tomatoes, peas, corn, strawberries, blueberries and beans but I've never been able to get a melon to grow.
I live in Massachusetts, near the New Hampshire border so I have a short growing season. Has anyone been able to get a melon to grow around here? I'd like a suggestion for a variety suited to this climate and tips on how to handle it.
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General Schvantzkoph wrote:

How long is it usually between the last frost of spring and the first of autumn?
What is the typical (not maximum) temperature mid afternoon in high summer?
David
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On Wed, 09 Mar 2011 08:12:37 +1100, David Hare-Scott wrote:

The season is June through September

The hottest couple of weeks in the summer are in the 90s, most of the summer is in the 70s or 80s.

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General Schvantzkoph wrote:

I see why you have had trouble in the past, your season is short and not very warm. I cannot help with a quick growing melon but I do have one other trick that you may not have seen. If you haven't tried this before it will give you several weeks head start in spring.
Conventional wisdom is that you should sow cucurbits directly and not transplant them because they are susceptible to transplant shock and are often set back considerably by transplanting. However, you can transplant them without problems if you do it without disturbing the root ball.
The best seedling container for them is the plastic tubes that are used for tube stock. These are about 15 cm (6in) high, and 5cm (2in) across and taper towards the bottom. The ones with square cross section are better than the round ones as the roots don't go round and round. Sow one seed per tube in soil heavier than normal seed raising mix, these are big strong seeds and will deal with this quite well, the reason is to form a coherent root ball. Sow more than you need so you can choose the strongest seedlings.
Keep them in your hothouse, coldframe or whatever, once the cotyledons open they will need bright light and some sun. Plant them out after the last frost. They will come out of the tube with the root ball (well the root truncated square pyramid) intact and slip straight into your prepared plot with no shock. This will work for melons, cucumbers or any other cucurbit.
David
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On Wed, 09 Mar 2011 18:14:51 +1100, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Thanks
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