Low carb, high fat cute garden plants?

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how about zone 7. will olives work in zone 7, mr complexon? that's two whopping zones higher than zone 5.
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Sidebar: My niece started a low carb diet early this year and coupled it with stopping smoking . . . no one can tell me that decision can be a bad one!
snipped-for-privacy@spammerno.com writes:

While that might be true with a few people, it is certainly not true of everyone. I know of many "fat" people who are anything but lazy. Unfortunately, our society often equates heavy with fat and the two are not the same thing at all.
I need to only look at my own grandmother who for years hovered around 160 pounds, at 5'4" . . . anyone who would say she was lazy is a fool. She worked in the fields along side my grandfather, maintained a huge garden, keep beautiful flowers, sewed, crocheted, was a sports advocate, etc., hardly a person who even the most critical person would call lazy or looking for a panacea. Yet, she was not able to lose weight though her diet was not excessive in any area . . . it was simply her makeup. Pure and simple, that weight was where her body wanted to be, regardless of what she did. It happens.
For the record, her doctor was not the least bit concerned about her weight for she was healthy. Now before the critical among us jump on the bandwagon and discuss health problems related to being overweight . . . she celebrated her 95th birthday in August and is still as healthy as one can expect someone who has lived 95 years to be and, until two years ago, fully maintained a household!
The issue with health is not the amount of weight but rather whether it is healthy weight. A "normal" weight person can be very unhealthy while looking good to others.
If a person is physically active and has good muscle tone, which means exercises either by design or by life style regularly, he/she usually don't need special diets regardless of his/her weight. Apart from those folks who have organic issues (thyroid, genetic, etc.), the truth of the entire weight issue is how motivated the person is to lose weight. A person can lose weight and become healthier keeping exactly the same diet. Yes, he/she can. The first thing is to have the proper mind set. The next thing is to drink plenty of just plain water . . . you notice that diets mention water intake, there's a reason for that. Our bodies need that minimum of two quarts of water every day to metabolize properly. The next thing is exercise, not just once a day but throughout the day, the point being of getting the metabolism up early in the day and keeping it up throughout the day. Going to a gym and working out at 7 a.m. does only minimal good if the person goes home and takes a nap and is physically quiet the remainder of the day. Drinking water so the body can operate at proper metabolism, keeping physically active throughout the day to keep the metabolism up, and then following it with sensible eating will do the job for any person who wants to lose (and does not have organic issues as mentioned above). The third thing is, of course, the sensible eating. Keep away from the things that we know are not good for our bodies such as excessive sugars, fatty foods (and I mean *fatty* not just the type of food, chicken can have as much fat as a piece of marbled beef!).
It is a fact that *if* a person eats exactly the same thing in the same amounts and adds the water intake and exercise, that person *will* lose weight/tone and be healthier. It happens, naturally.
While I'm not a L.C. advocate, the premise behind it has good points. Staying away from excessive refined flour products (donuts, cookies, rolls, etc.) is not a bad thing . . . there are a lot of calories in that stuff and little food value. The important thing is that it has people thinking about what is going into their bodies.
If you really are concerned about your health and your weight, make everything you put in your mouth beneficial to your body; don't put it there only because it tastes good. If those who want to lose weight think of food like money and there is only a limited amount to intake like spending, they will begin to be more health conscious and are more likely to make life-style changes that will improve their health. It is the *mind-set* more than the *diet* that does the trick.
Whether I agree with the current low-carb fad (and it is a fad and will fade as many others have), it is encouraging people to think about what they eat. Any time a person thinks about what they eat is one step closer to better health. Thinking, after all, is the first step to doing.
As for those who say it is alone what you put in your mouth that determines your weight, I say they are full of it. After my son died, I averaged less than 500 calories a day for nearly a year and lost not a single ounce! On the other side, when my children were young and I was very, very active with three healthy little boys to keep up with, I gained not an ounce, staying within 3 pounds of 105 for years, even though I ate more than most men working outdoors! (I'm 5'6") There are many factors that enter into weight and whether an individual will gain or lose, or just maintain.
My point is that regardless of what you eat, make it all good substantial (meaning with health benefits) food, drink a minimum of two quarts of water every day, keep physically active (take the stairs, not the elevator, walk not drive to the corner market, etc.) by looking at your life and seeing where you can add more physical movement.
Insulting the ideas of others as to what type of diet to utilize to lose weight is pointless and only demonstrates ignorance as well as a lack of common consideration. Personally, I would prefer to hear all arguments (meaning *debate* not attacking) about the diets because somewhere there is something of benefit to me.
Glenna
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Green beans, peppers, lettuces, zucchini (big plants), spaghetti squash (train it and trim it back it can send out 12 foot vines without stopping) or other squash, eggplant(not sure if you get enough heat in zone 5). Broccoli and to a lesser extent cauliflower(only develops one head then stops). I did kerby cucumbers and made my own pickle varieties. COrn takes a lot of space and my second batch of the season was eaten by bugs and a near total failure.
I can't imagine not growing tomatoes! I went on maintenance for the summer/fall harvest so I could enjoy anything I wanted from the garden. After all it may be carbs but a lot healthier than say... sugar cookies. Has worked well since I don't hesitate to eat grape-sized tomatoes from the vine in the garden or slice-&-salt tomatoes in the kitchen as an afternoon snack. I tried canteloupe and watermelon this year but I messed them up with spacing and I got two 3" canteloupes. :-( Next year I will do better.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, <1 mile off L.I.Sound 2nd year gardener http://photos.yahoo.com/ph/royalfrazier /
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Thanks, a great list. I have a garden in the backyard also, where we grow some cabbage, tomatoes, sweet peppers, etc. The front yard, I think, should be for more decorative stuff, but, I like your watermelon and cantaloupe suggestion.
Backyard garden
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Greenhouse /
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ignoramus19552@nospam.19552.invalid writes:

I'm sure glad you added that "in most cases" because it doesn't "always" take years. My sister died the day before her 21st birthday (the day after Thanksgiving) of an aggressive cancer that "only occurs in old people" (her doctor's words) with the chances of her getting it "one in a million" (again, her doctor's words). As near as they could determine, it started weeks before her second baby was born that February. That would make it having been there far less than a year before her August surgery which revealed the cancer to the doctors, and required extensive surgery in a hopeless attempt to save her life. Even if they were off on their estimate of start time by several months, it would still make it less than year before surgery. Without surgery because of her extreme and increasing pain, she would have died with only an autopsy revealing that it was cancer . . . only the pain and lump were any symptoms which were attributed to an enlarged spleen.
When cancer growth is talked about, one must take into consideration the age of the patient . . . it commonly grows much faster in young patients than older patients. That has to do with cell growth and regeneration which becomes slower as we age.
And, yes, very healthy people can get cancer. A local doctor, a competition iron man athlete, who I would have identified as the healthiest person I knew if asked, died of brain cancer. He, undoubtedly, was yet another victim of former Hanford employees.

I wouldn't be at all surprised to see studies that show that a sudden change in diet (of less than three years duration) has much of an effect on warding off cancer which, as you said, usually takes several years to reach a point of detection. Helping get it under control might be another matter altogether since the mental attitude factor is an important part of any cure. Often people who have a good mental attitude beat unbeatable odds, against cancer and other medical issues, leaving doctors puzzled. I have had the good fortune to know several of those in my life. We humans are quite a complex machine with no one-size-fits-all answer or solution. The best we can do is take as good as care of ourselves are we are able to do, trying to educate ourselves to what is best (versus what we want!) and implement it into our lives. That is likely a large part for most of us on this group in having our own gardens. Even the few months a year we can eat fresh-from-the-garden veggies is a big plus for our bodies. I, for one, am not elated each fall as the garden is gone. As I type, the nights are cooler and production is definitely down. I console myself with knowing I can dig 'taters all winter.<g>
So, can we still plant garlic this late?
Glenna
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Glenna Rose said:

I don't plant mine until mid October.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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Diet beside, no one seems to have really answered the original 'gardening' question !
I must say I haven't read through ALL the opinions generated from this original post. Amusing though they all were. Someone hit a nerve ! I did see some minor attempts to answer the gardening/diet part of the question, but they were few and scant in information for 'growing' purposes.
Without wanting to add yet another opinionated response to Ignoramus's 'diet requirements' (Is that name a joke/is the question a joke?)
The original question relating to plants was
'My desire is to plant some pretty, high fat, low carb, edible plants that are not grains'.
I am not a diet expert, but my understanding is very few plants are high in fats.
High fats are usually meat/dairy products. The are exceptions of course, being mainly nuts. Man who would WANT to be on a diet without vegetables and fruit !!
Back to plants..
Sunflower's can be made into unsaturated oils, so yes they would suit.
Someone mentioned spinach. I may be wrong, but I didn't think it was high in fats.
You haven't said much about the soil quality, water and direction this wall faces or how long are you prepared to wait for your crop, because nut trees, depending on the nut, can be 7 years old before they give any crop.
I would suggest you research a few small nut trees if you intend to be on this 'diet' for want of a better word, for a prolonged or continuing period.
Pecans and walnuts would probably be best for zone 5 I believe, but too large for this area. Maybe a couple of hazelnut trees could work. (need male/female) I believe they only take a few years to yield some fruit. There are other nut trees of course, and you may find more appropriate types.
Also Avocado is an excellent high saturated fat fruit, but you need two trees and they are very frost intolerant. They may manage if you have a microclimate going in this position (but it doesn't sound like it)
I'd like to say good luck with the 'diet' but it sound's bloody unhealthy to me.. So, I hope you don't die of a coronary. But good luck in the garden.
Liza

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Thanks.
The direction is south and there is next to NO shade. It is former lawn next to a big oak that was recently removed.

I would absolutely love to plant nut trees (filberts expecially), but, unfortunately, there is an overabundance of squirrels, and they would likely eat all the nuts first.

Won't work due to -5F winters, plus I am allergic to them anyway.

Thanks for your concern, I hope not to die of coronary either and, frankly, I hope that have better chances of that being slim on this diet, rather than being fat on a "balanced" diet.
i
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snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com writes:

Are freshly dug potatoes better nutrition-wise than stored (assuming, of course, both are from your own garden)?
I'm a'hoping so 'cuz I prefer to leave mine in the ground until ready to eat them, partly flavor and partly so I can harvest something when all else is gone. :-)
I hadn't thought of red, ripe peppers being more nutritious than green; I'll leave more of mine on the plant now. Usually, I'm anxious to eat them so let few go red.
Glenna

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