Just planted our little farm - what next?

Hi,
Newbie farmer here. Just planted out little farm. About 9 tomatoe plants spread 2 feet apart, 1 green bean bush variety thanks to our daughters Kindergarten class, and about 6 cucumbers planted 2 feet apart. It was a busy morning.
So this week looks like temperatures will be mid 70's during the day going down to about 50 at night. No rain for the first 4 days which is probably a good thing. Had a lot of rain yesterday so the dirt is nice and moist.
This year I even added manure to the little farm and purchased a nice watering hose extension thing.
I have the area fenced in with chicken wire.
So now I just sit back and hope nothing wilts and water every now and then, right?
I have some of those tomatoe cages and I need to get those on asap. Someone suggested using tomatoe cages for the cucumbers as well. I tried to get my cucumbers to vine last year but they didn't seem to cooperate. Seemed to want to stay on the ground. Should I just let them grow as they want or try to get them to vine onto something?
Thanks in advance for any more tips.
Steve - tired farmer
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Fish emulsion now and then every two weeks for about six weeks.

Odd thing about tomato cages, if I use them on some tomatoes or cucumbers and not others, the ones with, grow faster. My tentative hypothesis is that the metal cages transfer heat into the soil around the roots and prompts faster growth.

Good. You just got a cardio work-out that would have cost you good money at a gym. You got some sunshine that will increase your vitamin D and increase your absorption of calcium. And, if your kids were with you, you just set a good example for them as well as having quality time with your family. What kind of price can you put on that?
Good going Papa.
- Bill
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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wrote:

Hey Steve,

Good on ya, Dad! Many kids take to gardening.... diggin' in the dirt and getting dirty and looking at all the little creatures and things. My grandson and I just spent the last hour in the garden, pulling little weeds, investingating all the little crawlie things he saw and eating *really* fresh radishes and chives.
I have to go rest my ears now.... I still don't think I hve caught up with all the questions and words!

Cages work pretty well for determinate (bush) type tomatoes. Indeterminate varieties ( vining types, they may grow 6 -10 ft tall, or more, unless you get medieval with the growing tips when they reach a manageable height. These type (indeterminate), often heirlooms, can be "tied to the stake", trellis, fence, etc. I have had them in cages before and they go over the top, back to the ground and take off along the ground.
Keeping your maters off the ground helps prevent midew, rot and other damp type problems. Easier to pick for us old fellers too. Take care not to overfertilize the maters, as mentioned, they will produce more foliage and fewer fruits.
Some types of cukes, particularly the asian varieties, will climb very well. I plant Japanese Climbing Cukes, among several others, and they haven't needed any assistance in climbing.
I have "trained" hybrid cuke to trellises and strings by using twine to tie them on and gently weaving the growing points thru the wires etc. You gotta keep on them.

Ditto what Bill says!
It is *very* rewarding, eating produce that you have planted and watched grow, knowing that it likely has much less or no pesticide residue and that it probably has many more micronutrients than commercially raised produce. I certainly will taste better!
Care, Charlie
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 12:22:31 -0500, Charlie wrote:

I agree, some things are not as noticable where they came from, but tomatos.... wow... there is such a huge differance between home grown and store bought toms...
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