Jiffy 7 seed starting greenhouse

Hi,
My name is Sheena, been lurking for a couple of months or so and have a question. I recently brought a Jiffy professional seed starting greenhouse. The one I brought is designed to start 72 plants. My question is if I have to fill up the entire greenhouse or can I just use about 1/3 of the space? My husband convinced me to buy the big one instead of one of the smaller ones with talk of some seeds not starting and others dieing but the more I think about it I really don't want to use up all the pellets. I am only going for to actual plants.
Thank you,
Sheena
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This is the tray with the clear plastic hood, right? There shouldn't be any problem doing a partial tray. The only thing I would recommend is that when you do a second tray, partial or not, clean the tray and hood, and then soak them in lightly chlorinated water (Add enough bleach so that you can barely smell it, soak for 20 min). This is to sterilize the tray so that molds and mildews won't get a foothold. You should get a hot pad, set on low, to put under the tray. A small grow light or a condensed florescent bulb(s) to help germinating seeds. Lastly, you will be tempted to put the sprouting plants out in the Sun. Be very careful to remove the plastic lid when the sun comes out or, you will fry your plants.
Have fun.
--

Billy

Bush & Cheney, Behind Bars
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Sheena said:

I always start at least twice as many Jiffy pellets as I want for actual planting. Not all the seeds come up successfully, and some of the resulting plants are obviously stronger or weaker than the others.
Also, I always pot my best Jiffy pellet starts in larger pots for more growing before transplanting them outdoors. If you don't intend to do this, then don't start your plants in the Jiffy pellets more than 3-4 weeks before you plan to put them in the garden.
Your seedlings will need to be 'hardened off' by being gradually exposed to longer and longer periods of sunlight outdoors. (The plastic lid should have come off for good soon after all the seeds had sprouted, well before you take them all outside.)
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Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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Thank you Suzanne and Billy for the advice. FYI, my plants are going to be tottally indoors (I hope it works). Live in Alaska and in an apartment, don't think the whole outdoor garden will work at the moment. :)
Sheena

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What kind of plants are you starting? It's best to start seeds about 6 to 8 weeks before your last frost date.
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Sweet basil and cat-nip, later some chamamile (havn't found any seeds at the local stores). I'm wanting a tea garden, specifically teas that are relaxing.
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I hope you have very sunny windows. These herbs are real sun lovers.
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