Jerusalem artichoke, where to plant

Hello. We have a root of dated Jerusalem Artichoke in the refrigerator. Where is a good local to plant this? It would be great to have a flowering 'food' just spread it's way across an area. We've heard that a baking flower can be made from the roots. Has anyone ever tried this?
Also, is there any other Zone 5 perennial that could be planted and be classified as an edible staple food, like a perennial potato (not that one exists!) Thanks!
Darrell Ulm
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Darrell Ulm wrote:

Your warmest spot in full sun.
It would be great

The Jerusalem Artichoke grows more like an annual. In spring it shoots from the tubers formimg new stems, leaves and flowers. Then in autumn the tops die down leaving just the tubers underground.
David
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Darrell Ulm said:

I've found this growing wild at the edge of the woods back behind our old house.
Apparently, to get good production of large tubers, you have to regularly dig them up and replant them in fertile soil. Otherwise, the chokes will be small and not particularly appealing as table fare.
Also, some people cannot digest the carbohydrates in them, leading to vast amounts of gas and bloating.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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In article <fd8328da-1dd4-4671-b3b4-f7bfb48529a3

Be aware that Jerusalem Artichokes will crop up everywhere after awhile. They don't just spread by tuber (which they do rather efficiently).
http://www.arthurleej.com/a-creepbellflower.html
A friend of mine calls this "the enemy" and advocates eating it whenever possible.
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 19:45:16 -0700 (PDT), Darrell Ulm

Darrell,
Give some serious thought to location before planting. A good location might be the next county. Once you've got them, you pretty well have them forever. Extremely hard to get rid of or even re-locate. Try to dig them out and miss just one little piece and in no time you'll have a whole new plot. Also, be aware that they are of the sunflower family and will get quite tall. Many of them on our property grow to a height of 8 to 10 feet. Food-wise they are quite bland but, do have some interesting gastrointestinal effects. I'd strongly advise against going anywhere like the theatre or the symphony after partaking of a meal which included "sunchokes" in any form.
Ross. Southern Ontario, Canada. AgCanada Zone 5b 43 17' 26.75" North 80 13' 29.46" West To email, remove the "obvious" from my address.
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