Is it ok to mix BT, Rotenone, and fish emulsion in the same sprayer?

Just a courious question. I usually spray each at different times but I need to do all three this weekend. I have done the rotenone today but it just got me to wondering if I could save a few steps if I mixed all together in the spayer and did it at the same time. My main concern is will the rotenone kill the BT? THanks. kenny
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kenny wrote:

My guess would be that it wouldn't. It might be a waste of BT anyway though. What pest do you have that BT will kill that the rotenone will not kill first?
Steve
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wrote:
I use the BT on my tomatos and cabbage for the tomato hornworm I did not know that rotenone would kill them. I have a slight problem with red spider mites on a few tomatos so I was wanting to spray them and the cabbage for worms that are starting to eat them. I figured to give them a double wammy before things get out of hand. THanks Kenny

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kenny wrote:

Kenny,
Due solely to its source of origin, rotenone is considered an organic control. So is curare.
Rotenone is, nonetheless, a potent broad-spectrum insecticide ... you are killing your beneficials off, too. Rotenone is not the answer, it's the problem.
Take a look at this web page. There are other highly effective and longer lasting means of controlling the red spider mite including biological controls and cultivational practices. As always, google is your friend. I searched using the term "red spider mite predator" and grabbed this link off the first page.
http://www.google.com/search?q=red%20spider%20mite%20predators&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
I quote a portion of the page:
"Control Biological Controls
Various insects and predatory mites feed on spider mites and provide a high level of natural control. One group of small, dark-colored lady beetles known as the "spider mite destroyers" (Stethorus species) are specialized predators of spider mites. Minute pirate bugs, big-eyed bugs (Geocoris species) and predatory thrips can be important natural enemies.
A great many mites in the family Phytoseiidae are predators of spider mites. In addition to those that occur naturally, some of these are produced in commercial insectaries for release as biological controls. Among those most commonly sold via mail order are Galendromus occidentalis, Phytoseiulus persimilis, Mesoseiulus longipes and Neoseiulus californicus. Although these have been successful in control of spider mites on interior plants, effective use outdoors has not been demonstrated in Colorado. Predatory mites often have fairly high requirements for humidity, which can be limiting. Most suppliers provide information regarding use of the predator mites that they carry.
One reason that spider mites become problems in yards and gardens is the use of insecticides that destroy their natural enemies. For example, carbaryl (Sevin) devastates most spider mite natural enemies and can greatly contribute to spider mite outbreaks. Malathion can aggravate some spider mite problems, despite being advertised frequently as effective for mite control. Soil applications of the systemic insecticide imidacloprid (Merit, Marathon) have also contributed to some spider mite outbreaks."
Although that last paragraph did not specifically name rotenone, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it has about the same killing power as the others.
Bill
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