interesting nibble

a friend of the family knows someone who is starting/running an organic eatery.
featuring seasonal veggies and using open air grilling and such.
there's a good chance i'll get involved with them in some manner if the people seem like they want to have help for dealing with the veggie scraps, perhaps an on-site garden, maybe even supplying some of the produce.
i won't know for a while yet if anything will come of it, but it's a nice thing to daydream about in the late weeks of winter.
things to think about:
- charcoal scraps from grilling and making charcoal roasters out of paint cans and small holes in the sides near the top. load with wood pieces, put on lid, upend in grill, gases from wood inside come out the holes and helps feed the rest of the wood fire, but leaves some char inside that can be used in the gardens. empty and refill each morning before firing the grill. not sure how well this would work but i think the idea is potentially a good way to moderate the heat from the wood bits and charcoal as often it seems grills get too hot...
- using two layers of steel along the sides of the grill, packing the side with wood chips to roast. holes at the bottom again to put the wood gas into the fire. perhaps needing some steel tubes and holes to distribute the gas. a much neater method of doing the above as it doesn't involve messing with paint cans. just flip open the side and remove the char and then replace the chips...
- bone grinding, scraps, to keep the wormies and garden plants super happy. one problem with recent bone crumbs is that they are basically devoid of all useful nutrients so they don't stink when packaged and sold at the stores. in old days bones were ground up and used in the gardens or fed to the critters/pigs getting all those nutrients back into the gardens via direct application or the muck from the piggies.
- veggie scrap processing... obvious, but i can vastly speed up decomposition/breakdown via worms by chopping and drying root crop scraps.
- cardboard shredding... so much stuff is packed in cardboard. let's use that free worm food for good nummies.
if anything the conversations should be interesting...
songbird
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songbird wrote:

That charcoal would be much more useful if mixed with KNO3 and sulphur in the proper proportions ... Just sayin' .
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wrote:

A.K.A. black powder. The militia must be in town. Check for people missing fingers.
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Billy wrote:

Hmmm , I see I'm not the only one here who has reservations about the direction our government is heading ... are you by any chance a 3%er ?
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wrote:

I'm not a member of any organized group. I'm a Green.
Jacksonian scholar, Robert Remini (The Age of Jackson), says, after studying electoral figures for 1828 and 1832:
Jackson himself enjoyed widespread support that ranged across all classes and sections of the country. He attracted farmers, mechanics, laborers, professionals and even businessmen. And all this without Jackson being clearly pro- or antilabor, pro- or antibusiness, pro- or antilower, middle or upper class.
It was the new politics of ambiguityspeaking for the lower and middle classes to get their support in times of rapid growth and potential turmoil. The two-party system came into its own in this time. To give people a choice between two different parties and allow them, in a period of rebellion, to choose the slightly more democratic one was an ingenious mode of control.
Remini compares the Jacksonian Democrat Martin Van Buren, who succeeded Jackson as President, with the Austrian conservative statesman Metternich: "Like Metternich, who was seeking to thwart revolutionary discontent in Europe. Van Buren and similar politicians were attempting to banish political disorder from the United States by a balance of power achieved through two *well-organized* and active parties."
The Jacksonian idea was to achieve stability and control by winning to the Democratic party "the middling interest, and especially . .. the substantial yeomanry of the country" by "prudent, judicious, well-considered reform." . . . That is, reform that would not yield too much. These were the words of Robert Rantoul, a reformer, corporation lawyer, and Jacksonian Democrat. -----
Let's pull weeds!
Back to digging up that orange tree, anyway. Ye hear that there is a bacteria that's killing off oranges? Hot breakin' news from about 20 years ago. Apparently, it has laid low half of the oranges in Florida, and now is attacking fresh oranges in California. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/slideshow.cfm?id=citrus-can-scientists -wasps-save-orange-juice>
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