I've got honey bees

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In other good news, I have a concord grape arbor in my yard. This morning I noticed that it was swarming with honey bees. I've had a few bumblebees in my yard in the spring but in very small numbers, 1 or 2, but I've never seen honey bees. But this morning I saw hundreds on my grape vines. Has anyone else noticed an increase in the bee population? I'm in Massachusetts.
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I've seem more honey bees this year than in past years..I tend to appreciate them more now

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    In what way is that "good" news? You have a problem: Because of their herding behavior that leads to total domination of food sources, AWA their spreading of diseases and infestations (mites) against which native populations have no defenses, European honeybees are decimating native solitary bee (such as bumblebee) populations; how, one might well ask, is that a "good" thing?     The very behavior patterns that make "tame" European honeybees so highly valuable to commercial, mono-cropping, Earth-damaging "AGRICULTUREmoneymoneymoney" are the same behavior patterns that, along with their diseases and parasites, make them so devastating to native insect populations. The presence of honeybees in the "woodlands" is always -->100% the fault of negligent beekeepers<--. Allowing honeybees to roam freely in the "native" or "undeveloped" bush has exactly the same deleterious effect as does allowing cattle, goats, and sheep (also alien species) to do so, the scale is just different and we don't _see_ it happening, and the perpetrators deserve jail time, IMO, because it's absolutely preventable. In my view, herders of domestic beasts do not have a "right" to inflict them on the native ecosystem but, instead, have a duty to that system to contain and control their animals.     I start most of my days killing honey bee scouts in order to prevent them carrying the news of my garden to their pestiferous fellows. Not only do I consider bee-killing to be an essential home gardening activity, I believe it should be a priority of any gardener who wants to minimize his impact on the native ecosystem and do his little part in preserving native insect species.     With an early start each morning, it is easy enough to intercept and kill the scout bees in order to prevent them from bringing the rest of the herd to a truck garden but I don't know about grape vine; depends on how aerial it is, I suppose. As a rule, I certainly don't recommend any insexticide but, in your case, the thing to do might be to locate the honeybees' nest and take out the entire hive at night when most of its inhabitants are present and lethargic or occupied with domestic duties. The few stragglers that spent the night away from the hive are not likely to be of sufficient number to maintain it.
--
the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

You have to be expert enough to tell the difference between honeybees and many other species. -- There are a lot of look-enough-alikes on the flowers in great enough numbers to confuse just about anyone, let alone the experts who sometimes say that you can't tell some species apart until you get them under a scope.
Whatever your opinion of escaped millifera, this djinn has left the bottle and can't be stuffed back in. Apis mellifera in the wild is there to stay ...and might become part of the solution to CCD.
It seems good practice to call a local beekeeper and try to save a colony before someone with more fear than good sense wastes it.
The up-front assumption that these bees are from a wild colony is a big leap into a dark hole. A neighbour could have taken up beekeeping.
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    You are correct. I inadvertently implied that a "wild" colony was the most likely source of the bees and that is not so. It is perfectly plausible -- quite likely, in fact -- that the bees come from the hive of an irresponsible beekeeper, and more's the pity. You are also correct that their naturalization is past rectifying. That fact, however, does not prevent me from protecting _my_ small ( 4-acre) patch of dirt and garden from them, refraining from buying so-called "wildflower" honey and exhorting bee herders to restrain and control their livestock. It can be done. IMO, anyone who can't discern working-class honeybees from the most commonly seen native bees (and wasps) has vision problems that, most likely, preclude gardening.     Personally, I take deliberate steps to encourage proliferation of indigenous bees and wasps. It is easy enough because I'm in a (rapidly suburbanizing) rural area. Of this 4+ acres, only less than an acre is "improved", the balance enjoying virtually no (significant) human intervention since the early 1960's. Fortunately, I am bordered on three sides by land that is unimproved or minimally improved. Of course, aerial power lines must be kept clear, but that's the extent of it and I attend to that task personally, the utility company's contractor being banned from here due to incompetence.
--
the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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Balvenieman;897834 Wrote: > General Schvantzkoph snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

> morning

> well

> depends

I think you'd better get your facts straight. First of all, the tracheal and varroa mites that are killing honey bees do not have ANY effect on native bees, so they are not "decimating native solitary bee populations" in any way. Secondly, your claim that honey bees "totally dominate food sources" depends entirely on the variety and number of plants in the area. There are many flowers that honey bees will not enter due to their shape and size, leaving nectar and pollen sources for native bees, and solitary bees fly longer hours, and in rainy and windy weather, when honey bees stay in the hive. And are you aware that native bumble bees are also used as 'managed' pollinators?
How disturbing that you begin your day killing honey bees. Like it or not, one out of every three bites of food we eat depends upon pollinators, and native bees cannot accomplish that alone - even if every honey bee disappeared. We need to encourage all types of pollinators, including honey bees.
So instead of killing, here's a healthier solution to the pollinator demands of our food system: let's all concentrate on improving habitat in our gardens and on our farms by planting native wildflowers and flowering shrubs into field borders, hedgerows, and buffer strips. This approach will reduce the need for all managed pollinators (both native and non-native) by supporting vigorous wild bee populations.
--
Our NativeBees


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With that in mind, I have noticed that the honey bees here are strongly attracted to catnip. I have cut the flowers twice, and it just keeps making more.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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How do they dominate food sources?
Do honeybees spread diseases where the other bees do not?
What proof do you have that it is the honeybee decimating the native bees? Are you sure other factors at work, like pesticides, herbicides and GMO,s are not responsible for the decimation of native bees, bee inbreeding?

What makes you the law giver that determine "what is right"? Are you going to remove what is not native? Or is it natural selection?

Honeybees do not travel much more that one mile from their hive. if a swarm escaped, honeybees typically will not survive a cold winter without a hive. My guess there is a local beekeeper nearby. A swarm of bees is worth about $80 US, if the queen is in the swarm. A local beekeeper would love to have it!
The honeybees arrived in North America the day after the horse arrived hundreds of years ago. If following your rational, do you believe that all humans should be exterminated that are not native as well?
Where there humans, their favorite food sources will be there also!
--
Enjoy Life... Dan Using an iPad

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In article <840119220303917960.801087dan-
snipped-for-privacy@positivegogetter.cooldude says...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balvenie
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I imagine a good scotch whiskey is a good answer as any :)
--
Enjoy Life... Dan Using an iPad

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    Yep; the 12y/o "Doublewood' product. But I hardly think 2 U.S. ounces daily is going to effect my mental state.
--
the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

There are times when your posts suggest significantly more.
And then there's the alias.
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    What: I give specifics for my objections to honeybees being allowed escape and remain in the natural environment and I'm a juicer?

    My, but you _are_ impressionable ;-)
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    Take a few minutes to read a book and you'll know.

    Who said other bees do not. But they got the mites and funguses from the honeybees.

    Get a book a read it. It's been a growing problem for at least 40 years.

    Those named items are rarely, if ever, applied in the wild. However, they do take out honeybees in greater proportion due to the bees' proximity to commercial crops and "improved" human habitat where, despite beekeepers' best efforts, exposure is inevitable.

    Where did I say that? Careful; your mental capacity is showing.

    No; just the invasive/destructive ones, such as: "walking" catfish; talapia (Nile perch);"wild" horses; free-ranging pythons; iguanas; European house sparrows; European starlings; Muscovy ducks; free-ranging parakeets; free-ranging parrots; spirolina; water hyacinth; kudzu; melaleuca; Casuarina equisetifolia (Australian "pine"); Schinus terebinthifolius (Brazilian pepper); Hydrilla verticillata; Egeria densa (elodea); all introduced grasses; mullien; Dioscorea bulbifera (air potato); Democrats, for starters. Get your head out of your ass and locate your state's "invasive" or "noxious" weeds/animals lists for a few more.

    There is nothing "natural" about the means of arrival of the above-named plants and animals, including honeybees. Obviously, over time, some of them _may_ have eventually got to the Americas by natural processes but who's to say if or when; you? I don't think so....

    News flash: Not the entire planet, not even the entirety of North America has sufficiently cold winters. Where I live, they survive for years and years in trees, between inner and outer walls of buildings, in unused outbuildings....

    Clearly, reading for comprehension is not your strong point. I'm not advocating exterminating honeybees. Get your mother to read and explain the original post to you. Man, I cannot believe I deliberately bypassed my twit filter just to read your silliness to see what evoked another asshole's followup to your inanity. I certainly know better now, don't I? Back into your box you go....
--
the Balvenieman
USDA zone 9b, peninsular Florida, U.S.A.
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It probably depends on the importance you put on the survival of a huge slab of the human race. Personally, I think humanity needs a good scourge, but most people don't see it the same way as I do. I reckon that at least half of the human race could disappear and that that would be a good thing. Bees are important when it comes to feeding humans so those European honey bees are needed as part of the feeding process regardless of whether we have a scourge or not.
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says...

I used to feel this way until I realized that a disease that can take out 50% can take out 100% by itself without considering waves of disease, vermin, etc. that would follow.
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Great book, "The World Without Us", by Alan Weisman <(Amazon.com product link shortened) _1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid82344894&sr=1-1>
If you liked Jerod Diamond's books, you'll like this one.
In a hundred thousand years (the blink of an eye in geologic time), things could get back to normal(?) on Earth.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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'Billy[_10_ Wrote: > ;898003']In article snipped-for-privacy@news.execulink.com,

>

> huge

> but

> half

> -

> (http://tinyurl.com/38er4uo )

> in History\"' (http://tinyurl.com/29gxgs5 )

> (http://tinyurl.com/2gy7394 )
Default I've got honey bees phorbin wrote: In article 840119220303917960.801087dan- , dude says...
What makes you the law giver that determine "what is right"? Are you going to remove what is not native? Or is it natural selection?
'Balvenie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balvenie)
I imagine a good scotch whiskey is a good answer as any
--
Enjoy Life... Dan Using an iPad
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leenco12 <leenco12> wrote:

Use your own footers leenco12. Keep the messaging straight. If you don't like what I stated, respond to it in the messaging area! And use your own signature, do not modify my signatures!
Or I will report you :)
--
Enjoy Life... Dan L

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    Take into account the non-compliant news reader and the domain. leenco12 will be assimilated. Perhaps has been ;-)
--
Derald

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