How to kill a pyracantha!

I have had an apple tree that has been growing nicely from seed on the border of my garden. Its 10 years old and is only a meter high. It hasnt been looked after very well but I am in the process of regenerating it to its full potential. However my rude neighbour has planted a ruddy pyracantha right next to it!
Has anyone got any idea how to kill this thing off. Im very worried about my apple tree. I want to be able to kill this pyracantha without my neighbor noticing . Me and my neighbor do not get on so simply asking him to move it is out of the question.
Any ideas please! Thanks, Liam
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liampenn


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liampenn;962343 Wrote: > I planted 17 lemon seedlings from some lemons I brought from the shop. > Amazingly they have all grown. And are now over 2 inches tall!

> be much appreciated.

Hi Liam,
I have good news and bad news! The good news is, you're very good at growing things! :) Growing lemons from seed like that is not easy. The bad news is that these lemon trees will never produce lemons. However, you might be the lucky one.
In order to get lemons which are cultivated citrus fruit (that means they were developed by humans) you need one of two things: either a proven fruit-producing graft which you could graft onto your lemon seed starts once they get big enough, or to start the new tree from a leafing branch of a grafted lemon tree that produces fruit. The second option takes longer and does not provide a strong root stock typical of most citrus. Most citrus is made by grafting strong fruit producing stock to what is commonly known as a strong generic citrus root stock. You can tell the difference as the root stocks are leggier and thornier. Sometimes, a grafted tree will sprout branches from the root stock below the graft, these need to be cut back severely as they do not produce fruit and will just drain the tree.
In any event, your little lemon plants can thrive and may even flower. But the likelihood of them producing edible lemons is very slim, sorry to say.
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rhubarb


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"rhubarb" < snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk

Actually in all probability, they are more likely to produce lemons than not. Having said that, the climate in the UK is more of a limitation because it probably isn't warm enough than the plants having been grown from seeds.
However,

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I managed to kill off a couple of citrus trees, the grafted part at least, I now have to strange lemon trees that bear the ugliest thickest skinned fruit which although not very juicy have the most amazing amount of zest and oil in the skins.
I should have dug them out but it was a busy/lazy time and I lived in hope when I saw the green shoots.
Mike
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rhubarb wrote:

What you said would be true if we were talking about apples. Citrus often grow true from seed. Sometimes you even get an asexual clone of the mother plant.
Bob
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What about pear, peach, and Concord grapes?
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natp wrote:

What about them?
Bob
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Do they grow true from seed?
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wrote:

I have peach seedlings come up in my garden that do seem to be true to the parent/s. I've been growing them on and planting them out or passing them on the friends for years. They are supposedly ornamental flowering peaches and they put on a stunning show of hot pink double flowers in the Spring, but we have found that they are also superb eating peaches. They look disgusting being small and green even when fully ripe but they are THE most fragrant white fleshed juicy peaches and are simply deilicious.
I have a large garden so have lots of space to keep planting things that come up from seeds, but if you have the spcae, I recommend giving it a try - you can always cut it off at the ankles later if you don't like the result.
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Your lemon plants are 2 inches tall. Now you must use potting soil and moisten the soil slightly, then cover the top of the pot in which you planted it with plastic wrap to reduce evaporation so that the seed and soil will not rapidly dry out. As the soil begins to dry, add a little water, but be sure the soil does not become soggy. The pot in which you planted the seed should have drainage holes so that surplus water may drain away when you irrigate your seed and later the seedling.
Keep the pot with seeds in a warm location, such as the top of your refrigerator, until the seeds germinate. For this first period light is not necessary, but once the seedlings begin to appear, they will need light. If they are in a dark location, move them to a location which receives several hours of bright light each day. Direct sunlight is not necessary, but bright light is necessary.
An interesting thing about citrus seeds is that you may get several seedlings from each seed. One of these will be from the embryo formed due to pollination in the orchard, but the others will be "apomictic" seedlings which are vegetative produced. That means that the apomictic seedlings will be exact genetic reproductions of the tree on which the fruit was formed, they are clonal seedlings. The one seedling produced by pollination will not be clonal as it will carry genetic material from the pollen parent (father) as well as the seed parent (mother). In any case, you should have a lemon tree, and it will very likely produce tasty lemons in about 15 years! I thought you would want to know that it will take a long time unless you graft from the seedling to a mature lemon tree. A mature tree may often be purchased at a nursery in the house plant section. There are dwarf house plants lemons from which you may also choose. Grafting may reduce the time for fruit production to only 5 years or so.
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adamthomas056


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