How raised is raised

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steve,
for the top edge so no body gets cut you could rune some cheap 1/2" or 3/4" garden hose around and tied with cable ties the hose needs to be cut along the length so it will fit over the edge of the metal.
snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
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I have worse luck with splitting hose than anything else. And I take Coumadin, so I avoid sharp things when I can.
Steve
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Have someone do it for you. You can also get cable covers from radio shack that are essentially the same thing. I had to put them over electrical cords in my house to keep the cockatoo from chewing them, until I built her her aviary. ;-)
--
Peace! Om

"Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot
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Everyone needs this "multi purpose" shear anyway: http://tinyurl.com/6d83do
http://www.cooperhandtools.com/brands/wiss/index.cfm?model_list=1&att_id=WIS004%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20&att1=Scissors%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20&att2=Specialty%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20
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toquerville@zionvistas writes:

Steve, since you are just beginning, you might want to start your raised beds lower the first year and then build onto them in later years. I have some which are seasoned 2x12 lumber, seasoned as in pre-used. For now, it is only that depth. However, I can add another 2x12 on top of the first later as I add more compost, etc. I hold them in place with metal electrical conduit tubing pieces driven on each side. Not fancy, but they work very well. I have left the conduit higher than the edges and placed ceramic garden-related bric-a-brac on them. One has a baby chick, one has a dinosaur hatching from an egg, another has a turtle, etc. These are picked up at garage sales, etc., for 50 cents or a dollar each and add that visual interest. If you are not going to cover the conduit ends with something, then you want to keep them below the top of the boards so as not to cause injury.
The other beds are made from recycled concrete blocks which I can easily add to as I prefer the beds be higher. The concrete blocks always give a good place to sit while I work on the beds.
I will NOT use treated lumber, either pre-used or new, because of the chemicals used in processing. I am in the last half of my life and whatever might leach likely won't hurt me but I have young granddaughters whose little bodies could be greatly affected by any leached chemicals. It just is not worth the risk.
The first raised bed I made was four feet across; this is too wide to easily reach from either side, so I have gone to three feet across. My goal is to have my raised beds easily accessible from a wheelchair should that ever become necessary which is why I have chosen methods allowing me to add height over the years. I also have them far enough apart to use a wheelchair or walker between them.
I read that someone said there isn't that much bending involved in gardening. Well, maybe not, but if, like me, there are certain angles you cannot bend your back without great discomfort, even a little bending is better avoided. Of course, as we get older, bending and discomfort becomes more of an issue.
Another advantage of raised beds is stability of the walking area between the veggies. In a garden, the footing can be uneven due to tilling, but with raised beds, the walking area is never disturbed. I became very aware of this when my grandmother visited the first time.
I like my own raised beds so well that as I am able to do so, my "main" garden will be converted to raised beds as well. Of course, the added advantage of being able to hoop them as mini-greenhouses is very attractive. In the main garden, I can plant such things as tomato plants on the edges (two across) and the plants have the full advantage of the soil under the pathways so I really don't lose much in square footage and have great advantages gained by doing this.
As for temperature making a difference regarding materials, I don't see either lumber or concrete blocks being dependent on weather unless the blocks are mortared. Stacked blocks allow water to drain from the beds so freezing water is not an issue.
For one raised bed, I used 5-ft pieces of conduit at each corner to hold the boards in place. Those extended conduit pieces make good storage for my liter pop bottles used for hot-houses when that purpose is done. I use both the 2-liter and 3-liter sizes; the 3-liter fits nicely over the 2-liter giving 2-for-1 storage area.
Just my thoughts.
Glenna
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I made 4 raised beds 4x10 by 1ft hi nade then close enough I am able to sit on one and work on the other

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