How long does it take for seeds to sprout?

I planted a number of seeds a couple of weeks ago but I don't see any signs of life yet. I planted the following,
Silver Queen Corn Peas (soaked the seeds overnight before planting, they looked like they were sprouting when I planted them). Beans (same as peas) Cucumbers Carrots Spinach
The only thing that looks like it's coming up is the spinach. There are some grass like plants in a thin line where I planted the spinach so I assume that's my plants and not grass.
I have set up an automatic sprinkling system that waters the gardens for 10 minutes before dawn and 10 minutes after sunset.
My tomato and strawberry plants (planted from flats not seeds) are doing fine with the exception of a couple of rows that appear to have been eaten by somebody.
Did I plant to early? I'm in Massachusetts near Nashua and Lowell.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Carrots are known for their tardiness. Do you have any idea of your soil temperature? Peas should be showing up soon.
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/news/story.php?S_No 1&storyType=garde Crops that will germinate in the coolest soils (down to 40 degrees) include arugula, fava beans, kale, lettuce, pac choi, parsnips, peas, radicchio, radish and spinach seed.
With a soil temperature above 50 degrees, Chinese cabbage, leeks, onions, Swiss chard, and turnips can be planted.
When the soil warms to 60 degrees, warm season and many cool season vegetables can be sown, including beans, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots and cauliflower. But be forewarned – beans will not tolerate any frost and may have to be planted again if the temperature goes below freezing.
Wait until the soil warms to above 70 degrees to plant warm season vegetables including tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, cucumbers, squash, corn and melons. Tomatoes, eggplants and peppers are slow-growing and take many weeks to grow to the stage where you can plant them out in the garden, so you might want to purchase these as starts from your local garden center. On the other hand, squash, cucumbers and corn grow quickly and are easier to start from seed.
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/county/smith/tips/veggie/soiltemp.html Planting too early, before the soil has had time to warm up, can lead to seed rot, slowed germination, poor growth and disease. Setting pepper plants out before the soil temperature is 70 degrees F could stunt their growth for the entire growing season.

--

Billy
Bush Behind Bars
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't water in the evening because that will cool the soil for the night. Water extra in the morning, if you need to, when the sun will re-warm the soil.

Yikes! Only a couple of rows? When were you going to panic? Are we taking rolly pollies, snails, or rabbits?
I like tomato cages wrapped with chicken wire for large problems, like my curious pets, iron (ferric) phosphate for gastropods, and sets for rolly pollies and earwigs.
--

Billy
Bush Behind Bars
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 May 2008 10:46:39 -0700, Billy wrote:

I don't know whats doing it. I have two gardens, one 14x60 and the other 15x20. Both have fences around them, the big garden is next to the woods, the small garden is in the middle of the yard about 5 ft from the big garden. I planted 42 tomato plants, everything in the small garden is fine, a couple of rows in the big garden are also fine however two rows in the big garden were completely eaten. I also put in an Arctic Kiwi next to my grape arbor, something stripped most of the leaves off of that also. I planted a couple of marigolds next to the Kiwi, they've been eaten also. The marigolds in the big and small gardens are fine.
I've caught one groundhog with my live trap and moved him about 5 miles away, that was before any damage was done. I haven't caught anymore since the first. Also the groundhog tunnel that was going into my big garden hasn't been reopened since I filled it in with used cat litter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Suggest you get a flashlight and make the rounds of the garden before you call it a night.
--

Billy
Bush Behind Bars
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 May 2008 10:56:17 -0500, General Schvantzkopf

Peas, carrots and spinach are cool weather plants. Corn, beans and cucumbers are warm weather plants. In fact, I just planted my bean and corn seeds today. The soil must be warm for them to germinate well. I started my cucumbers in the greenhouse and set them out this past Monday.
Check with your county extension service or local nursery for planting and setting out times. Both places should have hand outs with the information.
Use this link to locate your extension service. http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/index.html
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
:Check with your county extension service or local nursery for planting :and setting out times. Both places should have hand outs with the :information.
When I first started getting into vegetable gardening I bought a book, Sunset I think. It had a page or two for each vegetable and included all kinds of appropriate information including when to plant, what pests to look out for, caveats, etc. I still have that book and several others.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 May 2008 10:56:17 -0500, General Schvantzkopf wrote:

The arm pit of the universe... Lowell that is. That's why. Nothing grows in Lowell MA.
Actually, I originate from Worcester MA, but reside now in NC. Perfect weather for all kinds of crops, if'n we get enough water. But seriously, what has the weather been like ? If they were good viable seed the silver queen should've popped up within 2 weeks. Mine was all up within 10 days, but then the weather has been perfect this year. The same with my snow peas, cukes, swiss chard, crook necks, string beans, tomato, broccoli ( and whatever else I got out there ). And some were seed from last year ( kept in freezer ).
Then again, I planted a later crop of 'honey sweet' corn seed. Fresh seed. After 12 days and only 25 plants out of 3 rows I began diggin' up some of the seed and sure enough most had sprouted. Just growin' real slow I guess. MA has some peculiar weather early on. Probably cold nights with mediocra days. Dig up some seed and see what they're doing. If they are sprouting giv'em time. Don't water every day and night. Too much water ( especially through the night ) might rot the seed.
Usually seed packets have information about what temp, how deep, when to plant etc on the back of the pack. I do know that I don't start my cooler crops until soil gets up to 55ish degrees at least. Here that can happen as early as April, but up there I think it takes longer. But then I also remember for corn "knee high by 4th of July" if'n you're gonna make corn in MA. So that would spell plant in June to me.
Another thing to do is move south - then you can grow stuff year round. I grew swiss chard, collard, cabbage, broccoli, brussel sprout, turnip and cauliflower streight through the winter ( which lasts 2 months here in the sand-hills area ).
Good luck
= Me
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some seed comes up a lot sooner than others. Some you want 1/4 inch deep, some much deeper. Most seeds are viable for years but it varies considerably. Some will be viable for 2-3 years, some 7-8. You can test your seed to see if it will sprout by putting it between a couple of layers of moistened paper towel between two saucers for a few days and observe if little white roots come out of them. The paper towels must stay somewhat moist, so keep an eye on them.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.