Horse manure

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Would like to hear any information on putting horse manure in vegetable gardens as opposed to commercial fertilizers. I would like to apply it now? thanks hlb
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I use horse manure on veg beds as I seem to recall does David H-S.
I use it in all stages from very fresh to old and rotted, but it depends on the stage of the year and the plants I'm putting it on as to how fresh it is. There are some major cautions on the use of horse manure and it's sources that relate to where on the planet you are and also some seasonal hints. You don't say where you are on the planet and what season you are having so I won't go on without that info.
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I am in Arkansas U.S.A. thanks hlb
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I add it to the top of any beds mostly in winter or autumn by preference but I can do it any time of the year because it depends if my poo supplier has a pile and needs it removed.
I never dig it in until it's sat there for (usually) a season (so about 3 month) and even then I might not dig it in but scrape it away and shove it elsewhere. I live in a climate that gets 40C+ summers days and -9C mornings but snow is as rare as rocking horse manure. Basically I use it as a mulch and the worms do a lot of work.
Make sure the horse poo hasn't got any aminopyralid in it as that has caused major problems in some gardens.
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It is freezing here
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (HL B123) wrote:

Night time temps below freezing for the next 8 days.
--
- Billy
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HL B123 wrote:

I use it all the time. As well as supplying nutrients it improves the soil texture. I raise roses that grow to twice the expected height and pumpkin vines that envelope small buildings and slow animals. However if it is freezing cold nothing much is going to happen until spring. It takes warmth for your veges to grow and for microorganisms to get working to break down the manure. Why do you want to apply it now?
David
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Do you know what amendments your garden needs? That's the key to a good decision process.
    Una
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (HL B123) wrote:

Now would be a good time to apply fresh manure to a garden or a compost pile. Normally, you want your manure to be 4 to 6 months old when you apply it, which it will be when planting time rolls around. The manure breaks down slowly to release its plant nutrients. Chemical fertilizers (chemferts) are water soluble and run off with the runoff, polluting ground water, water tables, and waterways. Chemferts are responsible for a giant "dead zone" in the gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the Mississippi. In "organic" gardening, the idea is to feed the soil, and let the soil feed the plants. Chemical fertilizers kill the soil and cause erosion, but I'll save that for another time.
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I am not positive on this one. I know there are laws of some sort some where. Are their laws for commercial food crops for WHEN to put down animal manure down for crops. Like: cannot put manure down 30 days before planting? Or 90 days before picking? Do not put down manure on snow or after it rains?
Trying to find such information on the net, but get bogged down by tons of legalese reading. Not just treating manure.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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In the United States, for Certified Organic growers there is a standard from the National Organic Program. The NOP standard allows application of fresh manure under most circumstances. Note that NOP defines fresh manure as any manure not subjected to controlled aerobic decomposition.
Early winter is an excellent time to apply manure.
    Una
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As Una says,"early Winter", not late "Fall", when you might encourage late growth, waste of plant reserves, and perhaps kill your plant(s).
The main thing to remember about "fresh" manure is to keep it away from the edible parts of the plant. You don't want watering or rain splashing the fresh manure up on the parts of the plant that you will eat.
Then there is that other stuff about not adding too much for fear of burning the roots of your plants.
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Good point. That applies to horse "manure" in the sense of straw or wood shaving stall bedding. Urine is very high in available nitrogen. Urine-soaked stall bedding can burn plant roots by delivering a surge of excess nitrogen.
Horse feces have an ideal C:N ratio and by themselves will not burn plant roots. Many horse farms and stables pick feces daily and strip bedding weekly, so by knowing their cleaning schedule you may be able to select "manure" that has relatively more or less nitrogen.
    Una
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I've begun to think that 'burnign' story is an urban myth. I've yet to kill anything with horse poop and I'm pretty sloppy about the way I spread it and sometimes the stuff I spread has come from the insides of a horse less than a day ago.
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I wasn't specifically referring to horse manure. Chicken and rabbit manure can be toxic to plants, as can alfalfa meal, or fish emulsion, if not added according to directions.
Manure Chicken Diary cow Horse Steer Rabbit N 1.1 .257 .70 .70 2.4 P .80 .15 .30 .30 1.4 K .50 .25 .60 .40 .60
Manure Sheep Alfalfa Fish Emulsion N .70 3 5 P .30 1 1 K .90 2 1
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wrote in message news:wildbilly-

I wonder how many people here have ever killed anything with any sort of fertiliser? I know I haven't.
Anyone want to put up their hand and tell us if you have and if you did, what did you do?
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A long long time ago in a far away land. I put too much lawn fertilizer and roasted my front lawn. However, did it completely KILL it.. No. But I did BURN it badly where it took all Summer to heal.. Yes.
I have also over fertilized my tomatoes one year. Did it KILL the plants.. NO. Did I have nice ripe tomatoes That year... NO. I did have allot of beautiful green vines for my tomatoes and NO fruit.
This was done with commercial fertilizer, not animal manure. However, my little dog poops all over the yard now and where he poops looks nice and green.
--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Too much alfalfa meal on plants in pots. It just fried them. You could smell the ammonia.
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I didn't, but my next-door neighbor did.
One spring we both went to a horse farm and loaded up our small pickup beds with manure. The manure was maybe 1-3 months old (my best guess - I used to work with horses).
I spread the manure in my veggie garden, keeping it at least 8 inches away from the base of any plant. Most of it went around the edges and in the paths of the garden. I then covered the paths with fresh straw so I wouldn't be walking in manure. That summer (and the following summer) I had the biggest, healthiest plants ever, giving the most prolific yields ever, and the produce was the best and tastiest that I ever received out of that garden.
Meanwhile, my neighbor, using the same manure forked from the same pile, spread it at the base of all his plants. In another part of his garden where he had not yet planted anything, he tilled the manure into the soil and then a week or so later put in more plants. That summer he lost more than half the garden. The plants growing in the tilled area died first, rather quickly, within a month or so. The plants that had manure at their base struggled the entire summer to live, either producing very little or nothing, and then died a long drawn-out death.
Dee
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Dee wrote:

Sounds right.

This is entirely at odds with my experience. I cannot picture 1-3 month old horse manure doing this. Once it has rotted for a few months you can plant straight into it, I have a very vigorous self-seeded pumpkin growing in the manure pile right now. I would say the neighbour added something else (like a chemfert) and didn't tell you.
David
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