Hi! Raised Garden Questions

Hi! I'm glad to have found this group. I have done minor gardening in the past. The few years, I had very small vegetable gardens. Since moving, I have embarked on a large garden project. We just put up: a small greenhouse (6' x 8'); three 4' x 10' raised beds, one is 10" deep, two are 8" deep; two 4' x 8' raised beds 10" deep. I'm using the grid method for Square Foot Gardening. The pathways are gravel as is in front of the greenhouse. I have a small hardening off bed along the outside wall of the greenhouse. I have three of the five beds partially planted, one bed fully planted, and one to fill and plant. I still have trellises to build.
I have a couple questions. The grid for the SFG method seemed to help the planning and planting of the beds. However, I am wondering how practical this grid will be when the vegetables are growing well. Has anyone used this method? If so, would you mind posting a few tips? I found an idea for cascading strawberries using three pots in a magazine. The author indicated that slugs would not be a problem. I transplanted my strawberries into one raised bed and half barrow. I'm wondering if slugs will be a problem in the raised beds?
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I

My slugs must not have read that particular magazine--they are always a problem 8-0.
Seriously, you may have slugs, you may have earwigs, you may have any number of other plagues. Just keep your eyes open, and identify any pests you get so you can find out how best to deal with them. I find that striving towards a balanced mini-eco system, encouraging birds and predatory insects, goes a long way towards eliminating problems. But since I keep a permanent mulch on my vegetable beds, I do get slugs. Since I have discovered "Sluggo", http://www.pestproducts.com/sluggo.htm , (no affiliation) I can keep the damage under control.
Your projects sound great, have fun, Sue
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SugarChile wrote:

application of uncooked coffee grounds when you begin to notice appreciable amounts of damage.
Right about now someone always pops up to solemnly announce that coffee grounds do not contain enough caffeine to do the trick.
Baloney. Try it. This method has worked for me for at least three years (and there are usenet postings to prove it). At worst you'll be out a few dollars but your garden will smell great for a few days. At best, your slug problem will be gone for the season (the little buggers travel) and your garden will smell great for a few days too!
Slugs and snails eat decaying vegetable matter ... and that is a good thing. For one thing, their presence indicates that there is decaying vegetative material to be had. And that is a good thing, too. However, they also eat healthy vegetable matter such as strawberries and sweet pepper plants and that is a bad thing.
Bill
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[stuff deleted]

My experience with decollete snails after 6-7 yrs is that they somewhat control brown snails but not slugs (alas). I don't have to use snail bait anymore but I do set beer traps for the slugs.
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SteveO

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