Help please! Chilli plants, leaves brown/white

Hi all,
new to this forum, I would appreciate any help or advice on this problem.
At the beginning of February this year, I decided to sow 11 varieties of chilli plants, ranging from Habanero all the way to Scorpion Butch T. I propgated them indoors, in lidded propogatoers, and in a warm, sunny room. They germinated very quickly and began to leaf.
Once they were strong enough to handle, I transplanted them to seedling trays, and then into my greenhouse. They seemed to be doing very well, with big, green, healthy leaves.
But over the past week or so, I have been noticing that a lot of the leaves are rapidly decaying, showing black, brown or white spots, and a couple of leaves of some plants have begun to deteriorate. I have attached 4 photos as one image for you to look at.
I have put a lot of work into this crop, and am quite concerned that this is happening. Could anyone advise me what is happening to my chilli plants, and perhaps how to bring them back to health, so that I might have a good crop after the summer?
Thanks for taking the time to read this!
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+ |Filename: chilli_photos_4.jpg | |Download: http://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/attachment.php?attachmentid 994| +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
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aress


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How much light, temp, and water do they get?
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aress said:
It looks a bit (to me) like they were sunburned. It can happen when plants are moved abruptly from a lower light condition to full sunlight.

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Pat in Plymouth MI

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aress wrote:

They will need full sun to produce well.
D
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Say it loud enough, David, and you'll probably be able to hear the echo ;O))
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aress said:

Full sun--as long as you acclimatize them in slow steps.
On the other hand, the wild chiles of southwestern North America are often found growing under trees and shrubs, where they are shaded from the mid-day sun. (The birds "plant" them there.)
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On 5/15/2012 2:08 PM, aress wrote:

The foremost educational institution for chile research and development is New Mexico State University (Go Aggies!) Their listing of chile diseases has a whole section on leaf diseases here ------
http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_circulars/circ549.html
Hope this helps...
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