Help on this trouble grass


I am really struggle how to "permanently" eliminate this type of weed on my brick patio. Using the weed killer called ROUNDUP does not really work --- it only makes some of the leaves turned yellow, and then the young ones come back in a day or so.
What is interesting is that I actually put some landscape fabric on before we laid the bricks. It sounds like the grass pokes thru the fabric !
Please see the image on the link below:
http://tinypic.com/537zqsm.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6767nl1.jpg
Does anybody in this forum know a better way to solve the problem?
Thanks in advance
JIMMY
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Jimmy, the grass didn't "poke through the fabric;" dirt has settled in the cracks (on top of the fabric) and seeds have taken root. Two of the reasons why the grass has not grown from under the fabric: no sun to encourage germination, not able to grow through the fabric (providing you didn't damage the fabric when laying the bricks).
The "young ones" are different seeds that were ready to start when you sprayed; Roundup does not affect anything that has not sprouted; it acts on the foliage.
Cement would have helped quite a bit but not eliminated the issue since cracks soon start happening and soon the weeds are there to greet you.
This is a time to use your tea kettle. Pour boiling water wherever you see the grass appear.
Another solution is vinegar.
There are other things also but are either toxic and/or harmful to the soil; some would have worked if applied prior to the fabric and only for a year.
The big thing people miss when using landscape fabric, bark dust, etc., is that the current vegetation might be addressed but there is dust/dirt that accumulates on top and settles down for a place for seeds to take root. Weeds are successful because they can grow in minimally "desirable" conditions. Surely, you have seen something growing in a crack on the side of a building and definitely in the cracks of sidewalks.
If all trace of dirt/dust/soil could be kept out, those common weed seeds would have no place to take root. That is qualified with "common" because there are plants which need no dirt.
Of course, you could let them grow to tall enough to pull them, water the bricks to loosen the soil and pull the weeds by the roots - a solution for someone with more time on their hands than most of us have and certainly as exciting as watching snails race.
Keep pouring the boiling water which will be more effective than the sprays; it will cook the about-to-sprout plants as well as those sprouted and perhaps cook the seeds as well. Unfortunately, the problem will be ongoing as dirt will collect and seeds will be scattered. We welcome it with our lawns and hate it with our sidewalks and drives; contrary lot are we humans.
Good luck. I feel badly for you, all that work and now the weeds; it stinks!
Glenna
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

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Glenna Rose wrote:

It looks to be nut sedge that would grow through any plastic...it even comes through hard plastic kiddie pools and the toughened liners of above ground swimming pools if left in one place for the summer.

Nut sedge will be coming up from the "nuts" under ground, probably not from seed.

the boiling water will only kill the exposed vegetation and not really do anything for the under ground part of the plant, especially under patio pavers.

Boiling water pretty much sterilizes the soil killing any beneficial organism in it...vinegar probably is a close second to the damage along with possibly changing the PH of the soil itself..
Lar
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Horsenettle is the same. Right along the lines of mint. I have fought all three.

--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
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Yesterday, I tried to remove one of the bricks, and sure enough, the weed actually "poked" thru the landscape fabric from the under side!
Sounds like it is not going to be easy to solve.
However, it I continous to attack with ROUNDUP regularly, will it be eventually eliminated?
Please share your comments,
JIMMY
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jimmy snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It probably will be in your case. Most people fight nutsedge in lawns or gardens so round up usually isn't the tool of choice along with it is a tough weed to kill with many other weed killers (can't say I have ever tried round up on nutsedge). There are a couple of products that work well for nutsedge called Image and Manage but they would be costly for using it just for a small patio.
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I went to the local Homedepot and bought a gallon of a "new flavor" of roundup called Entended Protection. I cost about $19 (I think it is a stronger version). I applied to ALL gaps along the bricks. For few days now I have not seen any young weed emerged !!! . According the the product label, it should control upto 4 months. I am keeping my finger cross now and hope this works, even though it is not a cheap way to do.
JIMMY

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I am really struggle how to "permanently" eliminate this type of weed on my brick patio. Using the weed killer called ROUNDUP does not really work --- it only makes some of the leaves turned yellow, and then the young ones come back in a day or so.
What is interesting is that I actually put some landscape fabric on before we laid the bricks. It sounds like the grass pokes thru the fabric !
Please see the image on the link below:
http://tinypic.com/537zqsm.jpg
http://tinypic.com/6767nl1.jpg
Does anybody in this forum know a better way to solve the problem?
Thanks in advance
JIMMY
----------------------------------------------------------
Roundup worked for me for about 2 months. Used 2 applications as the Bermuda grass was being stubborn. Followed directions, including sunny warm day criteria. Location: gravel driveway. 4" sub-base, and compressed. Local weeds are beginning its takeover, Bermuda grass is still brown.
Dave
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Someone thought it might be a nut sedge. Here is a rhyme for you to be sure. Sedges have edges, rushes are round. Nut sedges are sorta triangular and have edges. Pick a leaf and feel the leaf to see if it has any edges. If it does you will see what I mean right away. You should try to pull up as much of a plant as you can and take it to your local greenhouse or garden center and ask for help. Don't go to a department store. They don't know what they are doing there! A prety sugestion for you to do could be to pull out all you can then plant creeping tyme.It does'nt mind being walked on and looks/smells good. Also, if your patio is shaded you could grow moss in the cracks. Collect some moss in the woods thats on rocks and break it apart into little pieces. Get some whole milk and let it get real sour. Mix the moss and sour milk in the milk jug and shake real good. I like to let it set over night. In the morning pour the mixture in a pail and paint it in the cracks being sure you get moss in the cracks. Some people say to put the mix in the blender but I don't. Once a month or so feed your moss sour whole milk till you see it growing. It really looks nice once it gets growing. The sour milk does smell. Hope I helped. Eddie
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Just noticed this message; goes back a way; you may have solved your problem.
In case not, I suggest pouring boiling water on the weeds. They'll turn yellow and die with a few days, and -- in my experience -- will not come back.
Be carefully handling the H2O.
Persephone.
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hello m8 ive just joined and i am a profesional block paver by the loo
of the photo the joints havent been filled with kiln dried sand thi realy needs to be added as it prevents any seeds etc. getting into th joints that act like a breeding ground . ithink i would sweep som sodium chlorite into the joints first then add the kiln died sand i possible run a compactor plate over the area before its swept off a this vibrates the sand into the joints if not just sweep it in bu leave some on top a let the rain wash it down into the joints hope i helps
-- dave n cally
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