heatwave tomato

Has anyone here had experience with the heatwave? They are recommended by the Texas Ag service because of our climate.
I am going to try them this year. Just to see what the difference is.
Thanks
Norma
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I have tried it several times and have not had good results. Probably just my garden and microclime. I live in Central Texas and it gets really hot, though not as humid as Houston. I have found that Bingo and Sunmaster seem to be able to set fruit in the high 90's. Nothing will set in the 100+ days we have so often. The really super tomato that was developed by Texas A&M ,about the same time, was Surefire. Surefire was one of the very best tomato for both production, taste and the ability to set in high temps ever developed. I have not been able to find a source for the tomato for several years. I heard that it was sold to Northrop King and that was the end of regular distribution.
Have Fun
Jim

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Jim Marrs wrote:

If I still lived in Texas (Houston or Central Texas) I would probably try Early Girl, Stupice, and other very early tomatoes to try to get a crop fast before the hot weather comes, then plant them again in the late summer for a fall crop.
Best regards, Bob
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Thanks for the feed back...I had heard of the Surefire too, but have not been able to find a source either.
I always plant a couple Early Girl and some kind of cherry (for the grandkids so they cant munch while I work), but thought this year I might give the Heatwave a try. TAMU recommends planting tomatoes in August here anyway, but after last the heatwave last fall I am not sure it would make much of a difference.
It is warm enough here my tomatoes are already planted, because I know that by late June neither them nor I will want to be outside much.
I usually take a nice few suckers off the still healthy plants and start some new plants for a second crop. I actually had one survive all year-even though our once in a century inch of snow at Christmas. Had the dogs not decided to bury bones under it last week I might be much closer to getting fruit...LOL.
Now if I could just bottle some of that humidity to water the yard with!
Norma
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wrote:

I love Stupice as an early tomato. I started mine the first part of February last year, and I picked my first ripe tomato the first week of May. It held up pretty well under the heat, too. Most importantly, it gave the <spit!> thrips a run for their money!
Penelope
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zxcvbob wrote:

That's what I do here in central Florida. I've had no luck growing tomatoes through July and August, due to the heat. But plants sown around Labor Day begin fruiting in December and I still have some producing now. I start some more in February/March and usually get a some production in June before it gets too hot.
David
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Try BHN 444, Sunbeam and Sunleaper as well. Ive had great success with those varities here in central texas. The heatwave and sunmaster types are being phased out.

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Thanks!

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