Heat wave killed my corn

I've got a few rows of corn in the back yard. They were coming up nicely; beautiful, lush and green, and we'd actually managed to eat a few ears before a sudden heat wave seemed to kill them off. Temps in the triple digits the last three days turned them from green to brown, although they were irrigated every day during the hot spell.
Now I wonder, should I pick all the corn as soon as I can and freeze it? Will the plants "bounce back" now that the weather is more normal, so I can go back to picking them only after the water has come to a boil?
On a brighter note, the watermelon seemed to thrive in the heat!
-Frank
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On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 11:03:34 -0700, Frank Warner wrote:

I'd pick it. My corn was pathetic this year, the biggest ear was less than 2 inches long. Corn normally comes in at the end of July or early August in New England, I didn't get anything until the end of August and what I got was small an overripe. I've managed to get two meals out of my corn field, I'm hoping I'll get one more meal before it all dies.
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Same here in Michigan. The unusually cold weather here kept my corn from growing well also. The old saying "Knee high by the 4th of July" was a changed to "Ankle high by the 4th of July" This year was a bust for corn for me also. Three days this entire summer that got above 80 degrees.
Enjoy Life ... Dan L
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Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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I noticed you hadn't done any updates lately. I guess it didn't really work out, then? I never got around to getting my pumpkins in, so mine was a "two sisters" deal. My Chires baby corn did okay, but the sweet corn pollinated too early, so many of the kernels ended up not developing. The ears were from 4-8 inches long, and while a few of them were nearly complete, most were comically random. (The kids loved eating the individual big, fat, yellow kernels on each ear!) The corn field made for good grazing outside, but we never had enough to make it inside. (Of course, with four kids who LOVE garden vegetables, a lot of things never make it to the house!)
The beans, I didn't pick at all. Just let the seeds drop. We'll probably have some volunteers next year. I've since mowed the entire field down, and will plant clover and alfalfa there soon. --S.
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On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 01:20:45 -0600, Suzanne D. wrote:

I got the same results with my three sisters plantings as I did with my conventional plantings. The corn plants were four or five feet tall in both cases but the ears were tiny. My bean plants were eaten by insects. The squash plants are large but they produced no squash. In the rest of my garden I got a few peas but not a lot. The cucumber plants were all eaten by insects, in past years I got lots of cucumbers. My carrots are tiny also, but bigger than last year. The only things that were a roaring success this year were strawberries and blueberries. I still have blueberries, the bushes have been bearing since the end of June and they are still going. I also still have the occasional strawberry. This is the first year that I've gotten any strawberries, I credit the chicken wire strawberry hats that I put on the plants. My tomatoes all came down with the blight, however I was able to save them with Agway's fruit tree spray which contains a broad spectrum fungicide. I'm saying goodbye to organic farming, next year I going to Agway and get whatever fungicides, insecticides and fertilizers they suggest.
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On 2 Sep 2009 12:39:20 GMT, General Schvantzkoph

Don't give up - tomato blight was a problem for lots of areas this year. Just plant your tomatoes in another location for a few years.
Beans like a lot of water - so do cukes. Neither like it too hot so plant them early and don't expect them to be producing in mid July. Insects won't bother healthy plants very much.
Carrots, potatoes etc need loose soil. I get bigger potatoes when I grow them in pots - same with carrots. When I used my neighbors well tilled garden, I got normal sized root crops.
There are lots of organic fertilizers you can buy or make on your own. I used to use an organic liquid that seemed similar to my neighbors Miracle Grow and I had good results with the tomatoes, which like lots of food. Like every 2-3 weeks.
This year I played with liquid seaweed and did okay, althtough I haven't been diligent. I also bought bat gauno which is still unopened. As we baseball fans say, there's always next year.
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Hmmm ...
The year I started to go organic, I had I terrible bug infested garden. The next year not as bad, still had bug problems. The third year and after, few bug problems of any major significance. I did have some bad bugs eating my lettuce this year - ripped off the bad leaves - the next week the plants was covered with ladybugs and I shortly after that I had the healthiest looking lettuce.
Today my garden has a few frogs, spiders, ladybugs and worms, all of which I now welcome with a smile. I never disturb those large spider webs between my tomato plants. I no longer have the infamous tomato horn worms. My tomatoes have never looked or tasted better. I have seen a few japanese beetles but not enough for major damage. It takes time for the slow moving good bugs to move in.
This also applies to the lawn as well as the garden. It takes much more work to have an organic lawn than the garden. However, it is worth it in the long run. It will take three to five years to get away from the lawn chemicals.
My corn did not grow well also, due to cooler temperatures than normal, not bugs.
Enjoy Life ... Dan
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Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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My 7 by 10 foot corn patch did reasonably well considering the seeds were planted late and the plot doesn't get a full day of unobstructed sunlight.
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